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IVF outcomes are associated with biomarkers of the homocysteine pathway in monofollicular fluid

IVF outcomes are associated with biomarkers of the homocysteine pathway in monofollicular fluid
IVF outcomes are associated with biomarkers of the homocysteine pathway in monofollicular fluid
Background:

Maternal hyperhomocysteinemia is detrimental for reproduction, but the effects on embryo quality are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether biomarkers of the homocysteine pathway are associated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. METHODS: In a prospective study, we investigated biomarkers of the homocysteine pathway for associations with embryo quality and biochemical pregnancy in women undergoing IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment (n = 181). In the treatment cycle, blood and monofollicular fluid samples were collected for determination of folate, cobalamin and total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations.

Results:

Of all the women in the study, 67% used folic acid supplements. In blood, a significant correlation was established between high cobalamin and better embryo quality [standardized adjusted regression coefficient: -0.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.30, -0.01]. In monofollicular fluid of non-supplemented women, high cobalamin correlated with better embryo quality (estimate: -0.87; 95% CI: -1.68, -0.06), whereas high tHcy resulted in poor embryo quality (estimate: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.08, 1.95). However, in monofollicular fluid of supplemented women, high tHcy correlated with better embryo quality (estimate: -0.58; 95% CI: -1.12, -0.04). In the total group, a 2-fold increase of monofollicular fluid folate corresponded with a 3.3 times higher chance (95% CI: 1.09, 9.71) of achieving pregnancy.

Conclusions:

An optimal homocysteine pathway in follicular fluid is associated with a better embryo quality and chance of pregnancy.


cobalamin, embryo quality, folic acid, homocysteine, pregnancy
1059-1066
Boxmeer, Jolanda C.
0c509cdc-e589-45d1-809c-dec6a025ba75
Macklon, Nick S.
7db1f4fc-a9f6-431f-a1f2-297bb8c9fb7e
Lindemans, Jan
2fe464f3-b659-460c-bde3-c54982286c0c
Beckers, Nicole G.M.
9a1cf5e3-d186-4f92-a06c-36eca664fadc
Eijkemans, Marinus J.C.
f95640f3-5107-4b1b-b924-ebac8a334321
Laven, Joop S.E.
840def1a-6693-4488-b412-29794c5fc56f
Steegers, Eric A.P.
6061f35a-1c75-4f9f-ac9f-ed369f475ce9
Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P.M.
804e3a09-9001-4b36-936c-e3ea5b856750
Boxmeer, Jolanda C.
0c509cdc-e589-45d1-809c-dec6a025ba75
Macklon, Nick S.
7db1f4fc-a9f6-431f-a1f2-297bb8c9fb7e
Lindemans, Jan
2fe464f3-b659-460c-bde3-c54982286c0c
Beckers, Nicole G.M.
9a1cf5e3-d186-4f92-a06c-36eca664fadc
Eijkemans, Marinus J.C.
f95640f3-5107-4b1b-b924-ebac8a334321
Laven, Joop S.E.
840def1a-6693-4488-b412-29794c5fc56f
Steegers, Eric A.P.
6061f35a-1c75-4f9f-ac9f-ed369f475ce9
Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P.M.
804e3a09-9001-4b36-936c-e3ea5b856750

Boxmeer, Jolanda C., Macklon, Nick S., Lindemans, Jan, Beckers, Nicole G.M., Eijkemans, Marinus J.C., Laven, Joop S.E., Steegers, Eric A.P. and Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P.M. (2009) IVF outcomes are associated with biomarkers of the homocysteine pathway in monofollicular fluid. Human Reproduction, 24 (5), 1059-1066. (doi:10.1093/humrep/dep009).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background:

Maternal hyperhomocysteinemia is detrimental for reproduction, but the effects on embryo quality are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether biomarkers of the homocysteine pathway are associated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. METHODS: In a prospective study, we investigated biomarkers of the homocysteine pathway for associations with embryo quality and biochemical pregnancy in women undergoing IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment (n = 181). In the treatment cycle, blood and monofollicular fluid samples were collected for determination of folate, cobalamin and total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations.

Results:

Of all the women in the study, 67% used folic acid supplements. In blood, a significant correlation was established between high cobalamin and better embryo quality [standardized adjusted regression coefficient: -0.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.30, -0.01]. In monofollicular fluid of non-supplemented women, high cobalamin correlated with better embryo quality (estimate: -0.87; 95% CI: -1.68, -0.06), whereas high tHcy resulted in poor embryo quality (estimate: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.08, 1.95). However, in monofollicular fluid of supplemented women, high tHcy correlated with better embryo quality (estimate: -0.58; 95% CI: -1.12, -0.04). In the total group, a 2-fold increase of monofollicular fluid folate corresponded with a 3.3 times higher chance (95% CI: 1.09, 9.71) of achieving pregnancy.

Conclusions:

An optimal homocysteine pathway in follicular fluid is associated with a better embryo quality and chance of pregnancy.


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More information

Published date: May 2009
Keywords: cobalamin, embryo quality, folic acid, homocysteine, pregnancy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 150727
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/150727
PURE UUID: 437778b5-66a5-4c27-9a19-b4253c9856a0

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Date deposited: 06 May 2010 11:12
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:56

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Contributors

Author: Jolanda C. Boxmeer
Author: Nick S. Macklon
Author: Jan Lindemans
Author: Nicole G.M. Beckers
Author: Marinus J.C. Eijkemans
Author: Joop S.E. Laven
Author: Eric A.P. Steegers
Author: Régine P.M. Steegers-Theunissen

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