The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Collapsing categories? Fraser on economy, culture and justice

Collapsing categories? Fraser on economy, culture and justice
Collapsing categories? Fraser on economy, culture and justice
This paper examines Nancy Fraser's attempt to repair the apparent schism between economic and cultural struggles for justice. Fraser has argued that the only analysis equipped to theorise the relationship between economic and cultural injustices is a "perspectival dualist" one, which treats the two forms of injustice as analytically separate and irreducible, at the same time as providing tools for theorising potential harmonies between the claims of groups agitating for economic and cultural justice. Fraser's contribution has been hugely influential, but this paper investigates how a series of significant shifts in her position have cast doubt on the coherence and utility of her approach. Specifically, it examines recent revisions to the social theory underpinning Fraser's account, and shows how a number of (necessary) concessions to "anti-dualist" positions call into question the diagnosis of the schism that her framework seeks to resolve, and undercut her arguments for a "perspectival dualist" approach to social theory. In light of concerns over Fraser's social theory, this paper also questions whether the political ideals of recognition and redistribution retain their critical or analytical value.
nancy fraser, culture, economy, justice, recognition, redistribution, parity of participation
0191-4537
409-425
Armstrong, Chris
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2
Armstrong, Chris
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2

Armstrong, Chris (2008) Collapsing categories? Fraser on economy, culture and justice. Philosophy and Social Criticism, 34 (4), 409-425. (doi:10.1177/0191453708088511).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper examines Nancy Fraser's attempt to repair the apparent schism between economic and cultural struggles for justice. Fraser has argued that the only analysis equipped to theorise the relationship between economic and cultural injustices is a "perspectival dualist" one, which treats the two forms of injustice as analytically separate and irreducible, at the same time as providing tools for theorising potential harmonies between the claims of groups agitating for economic and cultural justice. Fraser's contribution has been hugely influential, but this paper investigates how a series of significant shifts in her position have cast doubt on the coherence and utility of her approach. Specifically, it examines recent revisions to the social theory underpinning Fraser's account, and shows how a number of (necessary) concessions to "anti-dualist" positions call into question the diagnosis of the schism that her framework seeks to resolve, and undercut her arguments for a "perspectival dualist" approach to social theory. In light of concerns over Fraser's social theory, this paper also questions whether the political ideals of recognition and redistribution retain their critical or analytical value.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 22 April 2008
Keywords: nancy fraser, culture, economy, justice, recognition, redistribution, parity of participation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 150783
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/150783
ISSN: 0191-4537
PURE UUID: 8d73af47-0f60-45e6-8cd8-0bf6b5a041c6

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 May 2010 12:58
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:56

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×