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The enigma of chronic pelvic pain

The enigma of chronic pelvic pain
The enigma of chronic pelvic pain
Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) remains a difficult gynaecological ‘headache’. Despite its prevalence in 15% of women in the general population,
there have been limited advances made in the last decade in terms of its clinical management. In this article, we review the current
evidence available in the treatment of patients with CPP and also discuss some of the important management strategies that may prove
valuable. It is important to individualise treatment based on each patient’s history, signs and symptoms. The currently available information
about the treatment of women with CPP provides some support for the use of ultrasound scanning as an aid to counselling and
reassurance, the use of progestogen (medroxyprogesterone acetate) or goserelin for pelvic congestion and (with the aim of improved
function and self-rating) the use of a multidisciplinary approach to assessment and treatment. Adhesiolysis has not been shown to be of
benefit other than in women with severe adhesions. Ablation of endometriosis may provide benefit when this is the cause of CPP. Selective
serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants have not been shown to be of benefit. The management of CPP remains an enigma
and much needs to be done in terms of basic science and clinical research to address this problem.
chronic pelvic pain, adhesions, multidisciplinary, hormones, management
1756-1779
Cheong, Y
4efbba2a-3036-4dce-82f1-8b4017952c83
Lumsden, MA
d8356299-3e0d-49ee-8c1a-d68bcdb905f6
Cheong, Y
4efbba2a-3036-4dce-82f1-8b4017952c83
Lumsden, MA
d8356299-3e0d-49ee-8c1a-d68bcdb905f6

Cheong, Y and Lumsden, MA (2008) The enigma of chronic pelvic pain. European Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 4 (1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) remains a difficult gynaecological ‘headache’. Despite its prevalence in 15% of women in the general population,
there have been limited advances made in the last decade in terms of its clinical management. In this article, we review the current
evidence available in the treatment of patients with CPP and also discuss some of the important management strategies that may prove
valuable. It is important to individualise treatment based on each patient’s history, signs and symptoms. The currently available information
about the treatment of women with CPP provides some support for the use of ultrasound scanning as an aid to counselling and
reassurance, the use of progestogen (medroxyprogesterone acetate) or goserelin for pelvic congestion and (with the aim of improved
function and self-rating) the use of a multidisciplinary approach to assessment and treatment. Adhesiolysis has not been shown to be of
benefit other than in women with severe adhesions. Ablation of endometriosis may provide benefit when this is the cause of CPP. Selective
serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants have not been shown to be of benefit. The management of CPP remains an enigma
and much needs to be done in terms of basic science and clinical research to address this problem.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: June 2008
Keywords: chronic pelvic pain, adhesions, multidisciplinary, hormones, management

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 151495
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/151495
ISSN: 1756-1779
PURE UUID: 05b5730e-544b-436b-8c26-bd37e1ae22b5
ORCID for Y Cheong: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7687-4597

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 May 2010 09:03
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:37

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