The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Weight gain in pregnancy and childhood body composition: findings from the Southampton Women's Survey

Weight gain in pregnancy and childhood body composition: findings from the Southampton Women's Survey
Weight gain in pregnancy and childhood body composition: findings from the Southampton Women's Survey
Background: intrauterine life may be a critical period for the programming of later obesity, but there is conflicting evidence about whether pregnancy weight gain is an important determinant of offspring adiposity.

Objective: the purpose of this study was to examine the relation of pregnancy weight gain with neonatal and childhood body composition.

Design: the participants (n = 948) were children born to women in the Southampton Women's Survey who had dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements of body composition at birth, 4 y, or 6 y. Pregnancy weight gain was derived from the mothers’ measured weights before pregnancy and at 34 wk gestation and analyzed by using 2009 Institute of Medicine categories (inadequate, adequate, or excessive) and as a continuous measure.

Results: almost one-half (49%) of the children were born to women who gained excessive weight in pregnancy. In comparison with children born to women with adequate weight gain, they had a greater fat mass in the neonatal period (SD: 0.17; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.32; P = 0.03), at 4 y (SD: 0.17; 95% CI: 0.00, 0.34; P = 0.05), and at 6 y (SD: 0.30; 95% CI: 0.11, 0.49; P = 0.002). Greater pregnancy weight gain, as a continuous measure, was associated with greater neonatal fat mass (SD: 0.10 per 5-kg weight gain; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.15; P = 0.0004) and was weakly associated with fat mass at 6 y (SD: 0.07 per 5-kg weight gain; 95% CI: 0.00, 0.14; P = 0.05) but not at 4 y (SD: 0.02 per 5-kg weight gain; 95% CI: –0.04, 0.08; P = 0.55).

Conclusion: appropriate pregnancy weight gain, as defined by 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations, is linked to lower levels of adiposity in the offspring
0002-9165
1745-1751
Crozier, Sarah R.
f725a749-98a7-47ba-aa6b-8d8e17c72cad
Inskip, Hazel M.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, Keith M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicolas C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Cole, Zoe A.
6802e58a-59b3-4518-bb7d-6f721732cd61
Robinson, Sian M.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Crozier, Sarah R.
f725a749-98a7-47ba-aa6b-8d8e17c72cad
Inskip, Hazel M.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, Keith M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicolas C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Cole, Zoe A.
6802e58a-59b3-4518-bb7d-6f721732cd61
Robinson, Sian M.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b

Crozier, Sarah R., Inskip, Hazel M., Godfrey, Keith M., Cooper, Cyrus, Harvey, Nicolas C., Cole, Zoe A. and Robinson, Sian M. (2010) Weight gain in pregnancy and childhood body composition: findings from the Southampton Women's Survey. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 91 (6), 1745-1751. (doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.29128).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: intrauterine life may be a critical period for the programming of later obesity, but there is conflicting evidence about whether pregnancy weight gain is an important determinant of offspring adiposity.

Objective: the purpose of this study was to examine the relation of pregnancy weight gain with neonatal and childhood body composition.

Design: the participants (n = 948) were children born to women in the Southampton Women's Survey who had dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements of body composition at birth, 4 y, or 6 y. Pregnancy weight gain was derived from the mothers’ measured weights before pregnancy and at 34 wk gestation and analyzed by using 2009 Institute of Medicine categories (inadequate, adequate, or excessive) and as a continuous measure.

Results: almost one-half (49%) of the children were born to women who gained excessive weight in pregnancy. In comparison with children born to women with adequate weight gain, they had a greater fat mass in the neonatal period (SD: 0.17; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.32; P = 0.03), at 4 y (SD: 0.17; 95% CI: 0.00, 0.34; P = 0.05), and at 6 y (SD: 0.30; 95% CI: 0.11, 0.49; P = 0.002). Greater pregnancy weight gain, as a continuous measure, was associated with greater neonatal fat mass (SD: 0.10 per 5-kg weight gain; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.15; P = 0.0004) and was weakly associated with fat mass at 6 y (SD: 0.07 per 5-kg weight gain; 95% CI: 0.00, 0.14; P = 0.05) but not at 4 y (SD: 0.02 per 5-kg weight gain; 95% CI: –0.04, 0.08; P = 0.55).

Conclusion: appropriate pregnancy weight gain, as defined by 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations, is linked to lower levels of adiposity in the offspring

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 7 April 2010
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 152063
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/152063
ISSN: 0002-9165
PURE UUID: 926dec8c-3363-4f3f-ab59-ec58c6667852
ORCID for Hazel M. Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for Keith M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Nicolas C. Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512
ORCID for Sian M. Robinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1766-7269

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 May 2010 10:40
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:02

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Sarah R. Crozier
Author: Hazel M. Inskip ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Zoe A. Cole
Author: Sian M. Robinson ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×