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Motion sickness with combined fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation: effect of phase and the visual scene

Motion sickness with combined fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation: effect of phase and the visual scene
Motion sickness with combined fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation: effect of phase and the visual scene
Background: the view ahead influences the motion sickness of car passengers but has been found to have little influence on the sickness caused by low frequency fore-and-aft oscillation. Acceleration and deceleration of vehicles is accompanied by pitch motions that may influence sickness.

Hypotheses: it was hypothesized that: 1) a visual scene would influence sickness caused by combined fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation; and 2) sickness would be dependent on the phase between the fore-and-aft oscillation and the pitch oscillation.

Method: while viewing one of three visual scenes (internal view, blindfold, or external view), 6 groups of 20 subjects were exposed for 30 min to 1 of 2 motions (in-phase or out-of-phase combinations of 0.1 Hz fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation). The 0.1-Hz fore-and-aft oscillation at ± 1.26 ms-2 rms (displacement of ± 3.18 m) was combined with ± 3.69° pitch oscillation either in phase (so the pitch increased acceleration in the plane of the seat to ± 1.89 ms-2) or out of phase (to reduce acceleration to ± 0.63 ms-2).

Results: with both types of motion (in-phase and out-of-phase oscillation) there was significantly less sickness with an external view than with an internal view or a blindfold. There was evidence of an interaction between the effects of viewing condition and the effect of the phase between the fore-and-aft and the pitch oscillation consistent with blindfolded subjects experiencing less sickness when they experienced greater forces.

Conclusions: motion sickness caused by combined fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation depends on both the visual scene and the phase between the fore-and-aft and pitch motions. The minimization of sickness arising from such motions should involve the optimization of both the visual environment and the phase.
motion sickness, oscillation, fore-and-aft, pitch, visual scene
0095-6562
946-954
Butler, Colleen A.
87dbc490-bfb4-41a7-bf8e-a191450123e1
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Butler, Colleen A.
87dbc490-bfb4-41a7-bf8e-a191450123e1
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Butler, Colleen A. and Griffin, Michael J. (2009) Motion sickness with combined fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation: effect of phase and the visual scene. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, 80 (11), 946-954. (doi:10.3357/ASEM.2490.2009). (PMID:19911518)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: the view ahead influences the motion sickness of car passengers but has been found to have little influence on the sickness caused by low frequency fore-and-aft oscillation. Acceleration and deceleration of vehicles is accompanied by pitch motions that may influence sickness.

Hypotheses: it was hypothesized that: 1) a visual scene would influence sickness caused by combined fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation; and 2) sickness would be dependent on the phase between the fore-and-aft oscillation and the pitch oscillation.

Method: while viewing one of three visual scenes (internal view, blindfold, or external view), 6 groups of 20 subjects were exposed for 30 min to 1 of 2 motions (in-phase or out-of-phase combinations of 0.1 Hz fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation). The 0.1-Hz fore-and-aft oscillation at ± 1.26 ms-2 rms (displacement of ± 3.18 m) was combined with ± 3.69° pitch oscillation either in phase (so the pitch increased acceleration in the plane of the seat to ± 1.89 ms-2) or out of phase (to reduce acceleration to ± 0.63 ms-2).

Results: with both types of motion (in-phase and out-of-phase oscillation) there was significantly less sickness with an external view than with an internal view or a blindfold. There was evidence of an interaction between the effects of viewing condition and the effect of the phase between the fore-and-aft and the pitch oscillation consistent with blindfolded subjects experiencing less sickness when they experienced greater forces.

Conclusions: motion sickness caused by combined fore-and-aft and pitch oscillation depends on both the visual scene and the phase between the fore-and-aft and pitch motions. The minimization of sickness arising from such motions should involve the optimization of both the visual environment and the phase.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: November 2009
Keywords: motion sickness, oscillation, fore-and-aft, pitch, visual scene
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 152437
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/152437
ISSN: 0095-6562
PURE UUID: a921decb-0096-491b-b7be-4111b82c9e76
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 May 2010 11:13
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:16

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