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Symposium 6: young people, artificial nutrition and transitional care: nutrition, growth and puberty in children and adolescents with Crohn's disease

Symposium 6: young people, artificial nutrition and transitional care: nutrition, growth and puberty in children and adolescents with Crohn's disease
Symposium 6: young people, artificial nutrition and transitional care: nutrition, growth and puberty in children and adolescents with Crohn's disease
Of the individuals who present with Crohn's disease 25% are <18 years of age, mostly adolescent. Nutritional impairment and delayed growth are common at diagnosis and remain an issue during the disease course. Treatment has the primary aim to control symptoms, induce disease remission and achieve normal growth in the long term and includes nutritional support and early use of immunomodulation. Puberty may be discordant and is generally late and final adult height may not be achieved until the late teenage years.

Chronic ill health and delayed growth may be accompanied by emotional and intellectual immaturity. These factors, including the varying rates of physical and emotional development, need to be considered during adolescence with multidisciplinary input to ensure that the young patient is appropriately supported. Transition to adult care requires close collaboration between paediatric and healthcare teams with careful attention to nutritional, emotional and educational issues, all of which are relevant in the progression from childhood, through adolescence and to adult life.
crohn's disease, children and adolescents, nutrition and growth, puberty, management
0029-6651
174-177
Beattie, R. Mark
55d81c7b-08c9-4f42-b6d3-245869badb71
Beattie, R. Mark
55d81c7b-08c9-4f42-b6d3-245869badb71

Beattie, R. Mark (2009) Symposium 6: young people, artificial nutrition and transitional care: nutrition, growth and puberty in children and adolescents with Crohn's disease. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 69 (1), 174-177. (doi:10.1017/S0029665109991820).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Of the individuals who present with Crohn's disease 25% are <18 years of age, mostly adolescent. Nutritional impairment and delayed growth are common at diagnosis and remain an issue during the disease course. Treatment has the primary aim to control symptoms, induce disease remission and achieve normal growth in the long term and includes nutritional support and early use of immunomodulation. Puberty may be discordant and is generally late and final adult height may not be achieved until the late teenage years.

Chronic ill health and delayed growth may be accompanied by emotional and intellectual immaturity. These factors, including the varying rates of physical and emotional development, need to be considered during adolescence with multidisciplinary input to ensure that the young patient is appropriately supported. Transition to adult care requires close collaboration between paediatric and healthcare teams with careful attention to nutritional, emotional and educational issues, all of which are relevant in the progression from childhood, through adolescence and to adult life.

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More information

Published date: 8 December 2009
Keywords: crohn's disease, children and adolescents, nutrition and growth, puberty, management

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 152497
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/152497
ISSN: 0029-6651
PURE UUID: 5f932fbe-b6a2-43ce-a868-ce0263360e73

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Date deposited: 14 May 2010 13:18
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:59

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Author: R. Mark Beattie

University divisions

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