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Scientific Review: The Role of Nutrients in Immune Function of Infants and Young Children Emerging Evidence for Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

Caplan, Michael , Calder, Philip and Prescott, Susan (eds.) (2007) Scientific Review: The Role of Nutrients in Immune Function of Infants and Young Children Emerging Evidence for Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids , Glenview, US Mead Johnson & Company 40pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

Growing evidence suggests that long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) have critical roles in the growth and development of infants and children and may have beneficial long-term effects on health throughout life. Studies have shown that two LCPUFA in particular, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (ARA; 20:4n-6), have important roles in infant cognitive development, visual acuity, and growth. These two LCPUFA are naturally present in human milk and are permitted as supplemental ingredients in infant formulas available in many countries. The purpose of this monograph is to review published studies evaluating the roles of dietary LCPUFA in supporting immune system development and function.

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Published date: 2007

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 152657
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/152657
PURE UUID: 19e0c509-f27a-48e3-bb0c-f3aaeaceb2c7

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Date deposited: 01 Jun 2011 08:50
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:53

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Contributors

Editor: Philip Calder
Editor: Susan Prescott
Author: Michael Caplan

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