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Polarised ATR-FTIR characterisation of cellulosic fibres in relation to historic artefacts

Polarised ATR-FTIR characterisation of cellulosic fibres in relation to historic artefacts
Polarised ATR-FTIR characterisation of cellulosic fibres in relation to historic artefacts
The utility of polarised attenuated-total-reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy was investigated for the identification of cellulosic fibres and characterisation of their state of degradation.
Turning the polariser so that the electric vector is parallel (Epll) or perpendicular (Eprp) provides a means of assessing the orientational crystallinity of cellulose from the polarised spectra of aligned plant fibres. Analysis of the spectra can reveal both the angle of microfibrillar wind and its directionality. Here, the best fits to the data suggest: flax 7?/S-spiral; sisal 25?/Z-spiral; coir 70?/S-spiral, where the predominant twist is given for the outer cell-wall regions sampled.
Polarised-ATR-FTIR also allows degradation of the amorphous component of cellulose to be highlighted, by recording spectra with the optimum alignment of fibre and polariser. Changes observed on thermal ageing of flax in air at 190 ?C are consistent with oxidation of amorphous cellulose and formation of carbonyl and carboxylate moieties; the non-dichroic nature of the carbonyl band confirms that the ordered crystalline regions were not primarily involved.
polarised infrared spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance, cellulose, ageing, degradation
0034-5806
249-259
Garside, Paul
58b3f896-8e10-4516-af7d-2aa7c106c517
Wyeth, Paul
1ec102cc-ce1c-4b58-81dd-a8a33b559081
Garside, Paul
58b3f896-8e10-4516-af7d-2aa7c106c517
Wyeth, Paul
1ec102cc-ce1c-4b58-81dd-a8a33b559081

Garside, Paul and Wyeth, Paul (2004) Polarised ATR-FTIR characterisation of cellulosic fibres in relation to historic artefacts. Restaurator, 25 (4), 249-259.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The utility of polarised attenuated-total-reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy was investigated for the identification of cellulosic fibres and characterisation of their state of degradation.
Turning the polariser so that the electric vector is parallel (Epll) or perpendicular (Eprp) provides a means of assessing the orientational crystallinity of cellulose from the polarised spectra of aligned plant fibres. Analysis of the spectra can reveal both the angle of microfibrillar wind and its directionality. Here, the best fits to the data suggest: flax 7?/S-spiral; sisal 25?/Z-spiral; coir 70?/S-spiral, where the predominant twist is given for the outer cell-wall regions sampled.
Polarised-ATR-FTIR also allows degradation of the amorphous component of cellulose to be highlighted, by recording spectra with the optimum alignment of fibre and polariser. Changes observed on thermal ageing of flax in air at 190 ?C are consistent with oxidation of amorphous cellulose and formation of carbonyl and carboxylate moieties; the non-dichroic nature of the carbonyl band confirms that the ordered crystalline regions were not primarily involved.

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Published date: 2004
Keywords: polarised infrared spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance, cellulose, ageing, degradation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 15328
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/15328
ISSN: 0034-5806
PURE UUID: f9785cf2-1e94-472b-aaa2-97aaf371478b

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Date deposited: 04 Apr 2005
Last modified: 25 Nov 2019 19:32

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Contributors

Author: Paul Garside
Author: Paul Wyeth

University divisions

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