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Children and teacher's perceptions of ADHD and medication

Children and teacher's perceptions of ADHD and medication
Children and teacher's perceptions of ADHD and medication
A detailed review of the literature revealed that children report mixed views towards ADHD and medication. They are also reported to experience a lack of control over their symptoms and in turn, report a reliance on medication to control behaviours. Research into children’s sense of self is conflicting, where studies reveal poor self-image, but other work confirms an inflated sense of self. In addition,
differences between adult and child perceptions of ADHD exist, and are explained by the Attribution Bias Context (ABC) model which describes the nature of informant discrepancies. Gaining a greater understanding of children’s perceptions of ADHD is important in identifying and implementing effective interventions for children and their families.

This qualitative study explored 5 children’s perceptions of ADHD through interview and drawing. Children’s teachers were also interviewed in order to explore discrepancies. Analysis of the data revealed a grounded theory of internalisation of the ADHD label for children, and difference for teachers. Children were found to experience ADHD emotionally, in on/off conditions, as a medical disorder, with external locus of control and as part of their self/identity. Medication was felt to control their behaviour. Teachers described children’s ADHD using a medical discourse and strengths were identified as attributes which are present in the absence of ADHD symptoms.

Results are discussed in terms of similarities and differences between adult and child perspectives, and only some of the data supports the predictions of the ABC
model. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of academic and applied settings, and future research directions are considered with particular reference to
exploration of the process of internalisation of the ADHD label.
Bradley, Jess
46ad82ed-3414-4b86-9e1f-f37afa577213
Bradley, Jess
46ad82ed-3414-4b86-9e1f-f37afa577213
Söderlund, Göran
3350a7f9-dc23-4c73-af2e-18cbb67dd3b4
Hadwin, Julie
a364caf0-405a-42f3-a04c-4864817393ee
Bishop, Felicity
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928

Bradley, Jess (2009) Children and teacher's perceptions of ADHD and medication. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 203pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

A detailed review of the literature revealed that children report mixed views towards ADHD and medication. They are also reported to experience a lack of control over their symptoms and in turn, report a reliance on medication to control behaviours. Research into children’s sense of self is conflicting, where studies reveal poor self-image, but other work confirms an inflated sense of self. In addition,
differences between adult and child perceptions of ADHD exist, and are explained by the Attribution Bias Context (ABC) model which describes the nature of informant discrepancies. Gaining a greater understanding of children’s perceptions of ADHD is important in identifying and implementing effective interventions for children and their families.

This qualitative study explored 5 children’s perceptions of ADHD through interview and drawing. Children’s teachers were also interviewed in order to explore discrepancies. Analysis of the data revealed a grounded theory of internalisation of the ADHD label for children, and difference for teachers. Children were found to experience ADHD emotionally, in on/off conditions, as a medical disorder, with external locus of control and as part of their self/identity. Medication was felt to control their behaviour. Teachers described children’s ADHD using a medical discourse and strengths were identified as attributes which are present in the absence of ADHD symptoms.

Results are discussed in terms of similarities and differences between adult and child perspectives, and only some of the data supports the predictions of the ABC
model. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of academic and applied settings, and future research directions are considered with particular reference to
exploration of the process of internalisation of the ADHD label.

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More information

Published date: May 2009
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 153323
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/153323
PURE UUID: 6da77088-e4b2-453f-b447-19450932ebe7
ORCID for Felicity Bishop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-6662

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jun 2010 11:18
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:47

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