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A critical reflection of computational fluid dynamics applications to fluvial sedimentary systems

A critical reflection of computational fluid dynamics applications to fluvial sedimentary systems
A critical reflection of computational fluid dynamics applications to fluvial sedimentary systems
A variety of computational fluid dynamics models for fluvial flow, sediment transport and morphological evolution have been developed and are in widespread use. Yet their quality remains unclear due to poor assumptions in model formulations, implementation of sediment functions of uncertain validity, and problematic use of model calibration and verification as assertions of model veracity. This paper presents a critical reflection of computational river models. It is argued that model calibration can be subjective, verification is impossible and validation does not necessarily establish model truth. It is suggested that computational river models remain premature, and high level expertise, physical insight and experience are vital for meaningful solutions to be acquired and for limitations to be properly assessed.
fluvial process, sedimentary system, sediment transport, fluvial morphology, computational fluid dynamics, mathematical modelling, river engineering, fluvial hydraulics
1901502961
463-470
IAHS Press
Cao, Z.
c541462a-b279-4c97-910d-69a6726c57c6
Carling, P.A.
8d252dd9-3c88-4803-81cc-c2ec4c6fa687
Dyer, Fiona J.
Thoms, Martin C.
Olley, Jon M.
Cao, Z.
c541462a-b279-4c97-910d-69a6726c57c6
Carling, P.A.
8d252dd9-3c88-4803-81cc-c2ec4c6fa687
Dyer, Fiona J.
Thoms, Martin C.
Olley, Jon M.

Cao, Z. and Carling, P.A. (2002) A critical reflection of computational fluid dynamics applications to fluvial sedimentary systems. Dyer, Fiona J., Thoms, Martin C. and Olley, Jon M. (eds.) In The Structure, Function and Management Implications of Fluvial Sedimentary Systems (Proceedings and Reports). IAHS Press. pp. 463-470 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

A variety of computational fluid dynamics models for fluvial flow, sediment transport and morphological evolution have been developed and are in widespread use. Yet their quality remains unclear due to poor assumptions in model formulations, implementation of sediment functions of uncertain validity, and problematic use of model calibration and verification as assertions of model veracity. This paper presents a critical reflection of computational river models. It is argued that model calibration can be subjective, verification is impossible and validation does not necessarily establish model truth. It is suggested that computational river models remain premature, and high level expertise, physical insight and experience are vital for meaningful solutions to be acquired and for limitations to be properly assessed.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Venue - Dates: International Symposium, Alice Springs, Australia, 2002-08-31 - 2002-08-31
Keywords: fluvial process, sedimentary system, sediment transport, fluvial morphology, computational fluid dynamics, mathematical modelling, river engineering, fluvial hydraulics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 15357
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/15357
ISBN: 1901502961
PURE UUID: 452fa90d-0d17-49c9-94fc-93dc3a4b0861

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Apr 2005
Last modified: 06 Oct 2020 23:42

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Contributors

Author: Z. Cao
Author: P.A. Carling
Editor: Fiona J. Dyer
Editor: Martin C. Thoms
Editor: Jon M. Olley

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