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Is fast access to general practice all that should matter? A discrete choice experiment of patients’ preferences

Is fast access to general practice all that should matter? A discrete choice experiment of patients’ preferences
Is fast access to general practice all that should matter? A discrete choice experiment of patients’ preferences
Objectives:

To determine the relative importance of factors that influence patient choice in the booking of general practice appointments for two health problems.

Methods:

Two discrete choice experiments incorporated into a survey of general practice patients and qualitative methods to support survey development.

Results:

An overall response of 94% (1052/1123) was achieved. Factors influencing the average respondent's choice of appointment, in order of importance, were: seeing a doctor of choice; booking at a convenient time of day; seeing any available doctor; and having an appointment sooner rather than later (acute, low worry condition). This finding was the same for an ongoing, high worry condition but in addition the duration of the appointment was also of (small) value. Patients traded off speed of access for more convenient appointment times (a willingness to wait an extra 2.5–3 days longer to get a convenient time slot for an acute low worry/ongoing, high worry condition, respectively). However, contrary to expectation, patients were willing to trade off speed of access for continuity of care (e.g. willingness to wait five days longer to see the doctor of their choice for an acute, low worry condition). Preferences varied by a person's gender, work and carer status.

Conclusions:

Patients hold strong preferences for the way general practice appointment systems are managed. Contrary to current policy on improving access to primary care patients value a more complex mix of factors than fast access at all costs. It is important that policy-makers and practices take note of these preferences.
1355-8196
3-10
Gerard, Karen
1aef0321-add2-425f-8cd6-48f1adeef928
Salisbury, Chris
50e9a5a0-c074-4af8-9b1b-e1e8408aae3c
Street, Deborah
22e9ae6b-42f0-4f3c-a2e5-731ae6f2ea8c
Pope, Catherine
21ae1290-0838-4245-adcf-6f901a0d4607
Gerard, Karen
1aef0321-add2-425f-8cd6-48f1adeef928
Salisbury, Chris
50e9a5a0-c074-4af8-9b1b-e1e8408aae3c
Street, Deborah
22e9ae6b-42f0-4f3c-a2e5-731ae6f2ea8c
Pope, Catherine
21ae1290-0838-4245-adcf-6f901a0d4607

Gerard, Karen, Salisbury, Chris, Street, Deborah and Pope, Catherine (2008) Is fast access to general practice all that should matter? A discrete choice experiment of patients’ preferences. Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, 13, supplement 2, 3-10. (doi:10.1258/jhsrp.2007.007087).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives:

To determine the relative importance of factors that influence patient choice in the booking of general practice appointments for two health problems.

Methods:

Two discrete choice experiments incorporated into a survey of general practice patients and qualitative methods to support survey development.

Results:

An overall response of 94% (1052/1123) was achieved. Factors influencing the average respondent's choice of appointment, in order of importance, were: seeing a doctor of choice; booking at a convenient time of day; seeing any available doctor; and having an appointment sooner rather than later (acute, low worry condition). This finding was the same for an ongoing, high worry condition but in addition the duration of the appointment was also of (small) value. Patients traded off speed of access for more convenient appointment times (a willingness to wait an extra 2.5–3 days longer to get a convenient time slot for an acute low worry/ongoing, high worry condition, respectively). However, contrary to expectation, patients were willing to trade off speed of access for continuity of care (e.g. willingness to wait five days longer to see the doctor of their choice for an acute, low worry condition). Preferences varied by a person's gender, work and carer status.

Conclusions:

Patients hold strong preferences for the way general practice appointment systems are managed. Contrary to current policy on improving access to primary care patients value a more complex mix of factors than fast access at all costs. It is important that policy-makers and practices take note of these preferences.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: April 2008
Organisations: Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 154879
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/154879
ISSN: 1355-8196
PURE UUID: afc6f05c-9ac1-4a94-b070-b23f6e2267fd
ORCID for Catherine Pope: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8935-6702

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 May 2010 11:20
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:45

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