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Staff - student relationships and their impact on nursing students’ belongingness and learning

Staff - student relationships and their impact on nursing students’ belongingness and learning
Staff - student relationships and their impact on nursing students’ belongingness and learning
Aim: this paper is a report of selected findings from a study exploring the relationship between belongingness and placement experiences of preregistration nursing students.

Background: staff-student relationships are an important influence on students' experiences of belongingness and their clinical learning. The need to belong is universal and pervasive, exerting a powerful influence on thought processes, emotions, behaviour, health and happiness. People deprived of belongingness are more likely to experience diminished self-esteem, increased stress and anxiety, depression and a decrease in general well-being. Nursing students' motivation and capacity to learn, self-concept, confidence, the extent to which they are willing to question or conform to poor practice and their future career decisions are influenced by the extent to which they experience belongingness.

Method: during 2006, 18 third year students from two Australian universities and one United Kingdom university participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed thematically.

Findings: participants described placement experiences spanning a continuum from those promoting a high degree of belongingness to those provoking intense feelings of alienation. Staff-student relationships (including receptiveness, inclusion/exclusion, legitimization of the student role, recognition and appreciation, challenge and support) were the most important influence on students' sense of belonging and learning. Similarities between sites were remarkable, despite the differences in healthcare and higher education systems.

Conclusion: staff-student relationships are key to students' experience of belongingness. Understanding the types of interactions and behaviours that facilitate or impede students' belongingness and learning are essential to the creation of positive clinical experiences.
belongingness, clinical placements, learning, mentors, nurse education, nursing students, staff-student relationships
0309-2402
316-324
Levett-Jones, Tracy
849c8b75-3575-490c-9daf-a80e792d53fe
Lathlean, Judith
98a74375-c265-47d2-b75b-5f0f3e14c1a9
McMillan, Margaret
e8ee08bf-1eac-49a9-a3ac-914292569236
Higgins, Isabel
debfcac6-c940-4383-bbcd-b285e644bd08
Levett-Jones, Tracy
849c8b75-3575-490c-9daf-a80e792d53fe
Lathlean, Judith
98a74375-c265-47d2-b75b-5f0f3e14c1a9
McMillan, Margaret
e8ee08bf-1eac-49a9-a3ac-914292569236
Higgins, Isabel
debfcac6-c940-4383-bbcd-b285e644bd08

Levett-Jones, Tracy, Lathlean, Judith, McMillan, Margaret and Higgins, Isabel (2009) Staff - student relationships and their impact on nursing students’ belongingness and learning. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 65 (2), 316-324. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2008.04865.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim: this paper is a report of selected findings from a study exploring the relationship between belongingness and placement experiences of preregistration nursing students.

Background: staff-student relationships are an important influence on students' experiences of belongingness and their clinical learning. The need to belong is universal and pervasive, exerting a powerful influence on thought processes, emotions, behaviour, health and happiness. People deprived of belongingness are more likely to experience diminished self-esteem, increased stress and anxiety, depression and a decrease in general well-being. Nursing students' motivation and capacity to learn, self-concept, confidence, the extent to which they are willing to question or conform to poor practice and their future career decisions are influenced by the extent to which they experience belongingness.

Method: during 2006, 18 third year students from two Australian universities and one United Kingdom university participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed thematically.

Findings: participants described placement experiences spanning a continuum from those promoting a high degree of belongingness to those provoking intense feelings of alienation. Staff-student relationships (including receptiveness, inclusion/exclusion, legitimization of the student role, recognition and appreciation, challenge and support) were the most important influence on students' sense of belonging and learning. Similarities between sites were remarkable, despite the differences in healthcare and higher education systems.

Conclusion: staff-student relationships are key to students' experience of belongingness. Understanding the types of interactions and behaviours that facilitate or impede students' belongingness and learning are essential to the creation of positive clinical experiences.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: February 2009
Keywords: belongingness, clinical placements, learning, mentors, nurse education, nursing students, staff-student relationships

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 155007
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/155007
ISSN: 0309-2402
PURE UUID: 76d2d27b-f355-4dd9-a575-575c59e54e2b

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 May 2010 15:22
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:58

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