The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

An assessment of the process capabilities of nanoimprint lithography

An assessment of the process capabilities of nanoimprint lithography
An assessment of the process capabilities of nanoimprint lithography
Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an emerging nanofabrication tool, able to replicate imprint patterns quickly and at high volumes. The present study was performed in order to define the capabilities of NIL, based on a study of published research and to identify the application areas where NIL has the greatest potential. The process attributes of different NIL process chains were analysed, and their process capabilities were compared to identify trends and process limitations.

The attributes chosen include the line width, relief height, initial resist thickness, residual layer thickness, imprint area and line width tolerances. In each case well-defined limits can be identified, which are a direct result of the mechanisms involved in the NIL process. These quantitative results were compared with the assessments of individuals in academia and within the microfabrication industry.

The results suggest NIL is most suited to producing photonic, microfluidic and patterned media applications, with photonic applications the closest to market. NIL needs to address overlay alignment issues for wider use, while an analysis is needed for each market, as to whether NIL adds value.
0022-3727
174001-174001
Balla, Tobias
24387d5e-4345-4608-8d24-89c82cfe9316
Spearing, S. Mark
9e56a7b3-e0e8-47b1-a6b4-db676ed3c17a
Monk, Andrew
59541231-e459-4228-8141-ad10647ef651
Balla, Tobias
24387d5e-4345-4608-8d24-89c82cfe9316
Spearing, S. Mark
9e56a7b3-e0e8-47b1-a6b4-db676ed3c17a
Monk, Andrew
59541231-e459-4228-8141-ad10647ef651

Balla, Tobias, Spearing, S. Mark and Monk, Andrew (2008) An assessment of the process capabilities of nanoimprint lithography. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 41 (17), Autumn Issue, 174001-174001. (doi:10.1088/0022-3727/41/17/174001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an emerging nanofabrication tool, able to replicate imprint patterns quickly and at high volumes. The present study was performed in order to define the capabilities of NIL, based on a study of published research and to identify the application areas where NIL has the greatest potential. The process attributes of different NIL process chains were analysed, and their process capabilities were compared to identify trends and process limitations.

The attributes chosen include the line width, relief height, initial resist thickness, residual layer thickness, imprint area and line width tolerances. In each case well-defined limits can be identified, which are a direct result of the mechanisms involved in the NIL process. These quantitative results were compared with the assessments of individuals in academia and within the microfabrication industry.

The results suggest NIL is most suited to producing photonic, microfluidic and patterned media applications, with photonic applications the closest to market. NIL needs to address overlay alignment issues for wider use, while an analysis is needed for each market, as to whether NIL adds value.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 7 September 2008
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 155213
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/155213
ISSN: 0022-3727
PURE UUID: 81fd9d16-6eae-4a02-a497-7b957ce80baf
ORCID for S. Mark Spearing: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3059-2014

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 May 2010 09:45
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:52

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×