The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Ultrasonically controlled release of ciprofloxacin from self-assembled coatings on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm prevention

Ultrasonically controlled release of ciprofloxacin from self-assembled coatings on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm prevention
Ultrasonically controlled release of ciprofloxacin from self-assembled coatings on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm prevention
Indwelling prostheses and subcutaneous delivery devices are now routinely and indispensably employed in medical practice. However, these same devices often provide a highly suitable surface for bacterial adhesion and colonization, resulting in the formation of complex, differentiated, and structured communities known as biofilms. The University of Washington Engineered Biomaterials group has developed a novel drug delivery polymer matrix consisting of a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogel coated with ordered methylene chains that form an ultrasound-responsive coating. This system was able to retain the drug ciprofloxacin inside the polymer in the absence of ultrasound but showed significant drug release when low-intensity ultrasound was applied. To assess the potential of this controlled drug delivery system for the targeting of infectious biofilms, we monitored the accumulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on hydrogels with and without ciprofloxacin and with and without exposure to ultrasound (a 43-kHz ultrasonic bath for 20 min daily) in an in vitro flow cell study. Biofilm accumulation from confocal images was quantified and statistically compared by using COMSTAT biofilm analysis software. Biofilm accumulation on ciprofloxacin-loaded hydrogels with ultrasound-induced drug delivery was significantly reduced compared to the accumulation of biofilms grown in control experiments. The results of these studies may ultimately facilitate the future development of medical devices sensitive to external ultrasonic impulses and capable of treating or preventing biofilm growth via "on-demand" drug release.
0066-4804
4272-4279
Norris, P.
f11006fe-92b3-4f5d-8be4-381dd1c4c07d
Noble, M.
4e378bdb-6835-49a9-b5a8-2ae1a78c5e7f
Francolini, I.
fbca2b3f-ff4a-45fa-b0c2-66810e708a19
Vinogradov, A.M.
f17226ee-10b3-4eee-9a9f-e2111fabafbd
Stewart, P.S.
c3f7967c-b984-4348-b248-880a6629ab2c
Ratner, B.D.
5eff40e8-8654-48c9-8461-54157123284a
Costerton, J.W.
1be42ff0-b76b-47e5-83a7-67bd2905dfc4
Stoodley, P.
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f
Norris, P.
f11006fe-92b3-4f5d-8be4-381dd1c4c07d
Noble, M.
4e378bdb-6835-49a9-b5a8-2ae1a78c5e7f
Francolini, I.
fbca2b3f-ff4a-45fa-b0c2-66810e708a19
Vinogradov, A.M.
f17226ee-10b3-4eee-9a9f-e2111fabafbd
Stewart, P.S.
c3f7967c-b984-4348-b248-880a6629ab2c
Ratner, B.D.
5eff40e8-8654-48c9-8461-54157123284a
Costerton, J.W.
1be42ff0-b76b-47e5-83a7-67bd2905dfc4
Stoodley, P.
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f

Norris, P., Noble, M., Francolini, I., Vinogradov, A.M., Stewart, P.S., Ratner, B.D., Costerton, J.W. and Stoodley, P. (2005) Ultrasonically controlled release of ciprofloxacin from self-assembled coatings on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm prevention. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 49 (10), 4272-4279. (doi:10.1128/AAC.49.10.4272-4279.2005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Indwelling prostheses and subcutaneous delivery devices are now routinely and indispensably employed in medical practice. However, these same devices often provide a highly suitable surface for bacterial adhesion and colonization, resulting in the formation of complex, differentiated, and structured communities known as biofilms. The University of Washington Engineered Biomaterials group has developed a novel drug delivery polymer matrix consisting of a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogel coated with ordered methylene chains that form an ultrasound-responsive coating. This system was able to retain the drug ciprofloxacin inside the polymer in the absence of ultrasound but showed significant drug release when low-intensity ultrasound was applied. To assess the potential of this controlled drug delivery system for the targeting of infectious biofilms, we monitored the accumulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on hydrogels with and without ciprofloxacin and with and without exposure to ultrasound (a 43-kHz ultrasonic bath for 20 min daily) in an in vitro flow cell study. Biofilm accumulation from confocal images was quantified and statistically compared by using COMSTAT biofilm analysis software. Biofilm accumulation on ciprofloxacin-loaded hydrogels with ultrasound-induced drug delivery was significantly reduced compared to the accumulation of biofilms grown in control experiments. The results of these studies may ultimately facilitate the future development of medical devices sensitive to external ultrasonic impulses and capable of treating or preventing biofilm growth via "on-demand" drug release.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: October 2005
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 155955
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/155955
ISSN: 0066-4804
PURE UUID: 4832be6d-f773-4949-95bb-130721a069ea
ORCID for P. Stoodley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6069-273X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Jun 2010 12:18
Last modified: 19 Jun 2019 00:33

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×