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Engineering approaches for the detection and control of orthopaedic biofilm infections

Engineering approaches for the detection and control of orthopaedic biofilm infections
Engineering approaches for the detection and control of orthopaedic biofilm infections
Artificial joints are subject to chronic infections associated with bacterial biofilms, which only can be eradicated by the traumatic removal of the implant followed by sustained intravenous antibiotic therapy. We have adopted an engineering approach to develop electrical-current-based approaches to bacterial eradication and microelectromechanical systems that could be embedded within the implanted joint to detect the presence of bacteria and to provide in situ treatment of the infection before a biofilm can form. In the former case we will examine the combined bactericidal effects of direct and indirect electrical fields in combination with antibiotic therapy. In the latter case, bacterial detection will occur by developing a microelectromechanical-systems-based biosensor that can "eavesdrop" on bacterial quorum-sensing-based communication systems. Treatment will be effected by the release of a cocktail of pharmaceutical reagents contained within integral reservoirs associated with the implant, including a molecular jamming signal that competitively binds to the bacteria's quorum sensing receptors (which will "blind" the bacteria, preventing the production of toxins) and multiple high dose antibiotics to eradicate the planktonic bacteria. This approach is designed to take advantage of the relatively high susceptibility to antibiotics that planktonic bacteria display compared with biofilm envirovars. Here we report the development of a generic microelectromechanical systems biosensor that measures changes in internal viscosity in a base fluid triggered by a change in the external environment.
0009-921X
59-66
Ehrlich, Garth D.
aa8e5162-77a6-4627-a793-acd724ed0782
Stoodley, Paul
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f
Kathju, Sandeep
80cdb7ee-2e0d-4e70-98c9-93682ce05a09
Zhao, Yongjun
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McLeod, Bruce R.
ba5598c2-98df-4fbe-9206-5cce3d6d7f4d
Balaban, Naomi
a171574f-cbbe-469e-afbd-b0ad346f9a45
Hu, Fen Ze
a6e5ffb6-a70d-4a7a-97bc-34b34d5bb0cc
Sotereanos, Nicholas G.
826c42da-c093-4a32-a0e4-9a0e8b54912e
Costerton, J. William
3561239b-c96e-41af-9228-4fc120466c4b
Stewart, Philip S.
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Post, J. Christopher
832cfa58-9254-4396-8c8f-6fb18cc6c18c
Lin, Qiao
4cd600cd-1dd2-4d87-b341-2fa8b7d31cc2
Ehrlich, Garth D.
aa8e5162-77a6-4627-a793-acd724ed0782
Stoodley, Paul
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f
Kathju, Sandeep
80cdb7ee-2e0d-4e70-98c9-93682ce05a09
Zhao, Yongjun
5f149af5-3802-4484-aa9a-2538a5cd2efb
McLeod, Bruce R.
ba5598c2-98df-4fbe-9206-5cce3d6d7f4d
Balaban, Naomi
a171574f-cbbe-469e-afbd-b0ad346f9a45
Hu, Fen Ze
a6e5ffb6-a70d-4a7a-97bc-34b34d5bb0cc
Sotereanos, Nicholas G.
826c42da-c093-4a32-a0e4-9a0e8b54912e
Costerton, J. William
3561239b-c96e-41af-9228-4fc120466c4b
Stewart, Philip S.
5b897b68-e2ad-4012-a4e0-b82d14d583db
Post, J. Christopher
832cfa58-9254-4396-8c8f-6fb18cc6c18c
Lin, Qiao
4cd600cd-1dd2-4d87-b341-2fa8b7d31cc2

Ehrlich, Garth D., Stoodley, Paul, Kathju, Sandeep, Zhao, Yongjun, McLeod, Bruce R., Balaban, Naomi, Hu, Fen Ze, Sotereanos, Nicholas G., Costerton, J. William, Stewart, Philip S., Post, J. Christopher and Lin, Qiao (2005) Engineering approaches for the detection and control of orthopaedic biofilm infections. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, (437), 59-66.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Artificial joints are subject to chronic infections associated with bacterial biofilms, which only can be eradicated by the traumatic removal of the implant followed by sustained intravenous antibiotic therapy. We have adopted an engineering approach to develop electrical-current-based approaches to bacterial eradication and microelectromechanical systems that could be embedded within the implanted joint to detect the presence of bacteria and to provide in situ treatment of the infection before a biofilm can form. In the former case we will examine the combined bactericidal effects of direct and indirect electrical fields in combination with antibiotic therapy. In the latter case, bacterial detection will occur by developing a microelectromechanical-systems-based biosensor that can "eavesdrop" on bacterial quorum-sensing-based communication systems. Treatment will be effected by the release of a cocktail of pharmaceutical reagents contained within integral reservoirs associated with the implant, including a molecular jamming signal that competitively binds to the bacteria's quorum sensing receptors (which will "blind" the bacteria, preventing the production of toxins) and multiple high dose antibiotics to eradicate the planktonic bacteria. This approach is designed to take advantage of the relatively high susceptibility to antibiotics that planktonic bacteria display compared with biofilm envirovars. Here we report the development of a generic microelectromechanical systems biosensor that measures changes in internal viscosity in a base fluid triggered by a change in the external environment.

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More information

Published date: August 2005
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 155957
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/155957
ISSN: 0009-921X
PURE UUID: 844c4a96-45f8-4563-80fd-be72b9b4b74d
ORCID for Paul Stoodley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6069-273X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Jun 2010 14:13
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:48

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Contributors

Author: Garth D. Ehrlich
Author: Paul Stoodley ORCID iD
Author: Sandeep Kathju
Author: Yongjun Zhao
Author: Bruce R. McLeod
Author: Naomi Balaban
Author: Fen Ze Hu
Author: Nicholas G. Sotereanos
Author: J. William Costerton
Author: Philip S. Stewart
Author: J. Christopher Post
Author: Qiao Lin

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