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The impact of the new public and private pension settlements in Britain and Germany on citizen's income in old age

The impact of the new public and private pension settlements in Britain and Germany on citizen's income in old age
The impact of the new public and private pension settlements in Britain and Germany on citizen's income in old age
This chapter uses policy simulation to illustrate the scale and nature of the institutional changes made to the German and British pension systems by reforms undertaken in the first decade of the new century. The projected outcomes of the new systems for a range of hypothetical biographies in both countries are compared with those of the systems they replaced. The chapter argues that the results of these simulations are consistent neither with the predictions of the gloablisation thesis nor regime theory. There is no evidence of institutional convergence on the basis of a ‘race to the bottom’, but nor have the two systems remained constrained by regime logic. In fact, Britain’s reform is strongly social democratic in orientation, with Germany’s strongly liberal. In the short-term these developments might generate some convergence of pension levels as German citizens spend more of their working life under the new less generous state system while Britain’s gradually gain the benefits of recent reforms. However, when analysis focuses purely on the nature of current public/private pension institutions as revealed by their projected outcomes the German system is shown to be more consistent with an ideal typical liberal regime than Britain’s.
978-0-19-958449-9
180-217
Oxford University Press
Bridgen, Paul
6a2060f6-cbab-47d4-a831-ff82350055c9
Meyer, Traute
ee469bf0-ab32-43ac-9f25-1261c24123fe
Clasen, Jochen
Bridgen, Paul
6a2060f6-cbab-47d4-a831-ff82350055c9
Meyer, Traute
ee469bf0-ab32-43ac-9f25-1261c24123fe
Clasen, Jochen

Bridgen, Paul and Meyer, Traute (2011) The impact of the new public and private pension settlements in Britain and Germany on citizen's income in old age. In, Clasen, Jochen (ed.) Converging Worlds of Welfare? German and British Social Policy in the 21st Century. Oxford, GB. Oxford University Press, pp. 180-217.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

This chapter uses policy simulation to illustrate the scale and nature of the institutional changes made to the German and British pension systems by reforms undertaken in the first decade of the new century. The projected outcomes of the new systems for a range of hypothetical biographies in both countries are compared with those of the systems they replaced. The chapter argues that the results of these simulations are consistent neither with the predictions of the gloablisation thesis nor regime theory. There is no evidence of institutional convergence on the basis of a ‘race to the bottom’, but nor have the two systems remained constrained by regime logic. In fact, Britain’s reform is strongly social democratic in orientation, with Germany’s strongly liberal. In the short-term these developments might generate some convergence of pension levels as German citizens spend more of their working life under the new less generous state system while Britain’s gradually gain the benefits of recent reforms. However, when analysis focuses purely on the nature of current public/private pension institutions as revealed by their projected outcomes the German system is shown to be more consistent with an ideal typical liberal regime than Britain’s.

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Published date: 26 May 2011

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Local EPrints ID: 156421
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/156421
ISBN: 978-0-19-958449-9
PURE UUID: d69ed1e1-9bdb-4bea-98e1-174ab59483f3

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Date deposited: 02 Jun 2010 13:06
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:42

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Contributors

Author: Paul Bridgen
Author: Traute Meyer
Editor: Jochen Clasen

University divisions

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