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The neural basis of effective memory therapy in a patient with limbic encephalitis

The neural basis of effective memory therapy in a patient with limbic encephalitis
The neural basis of effective memory therapy in a patient with limbic encephalitis
Background:

An fMRI study is described in which a postencephalitic woman with amnesia used a wearable camera which takes photographs passively, without user intervention, to record and review recent autobiographical events. “SenseCam” generates hundreds of images which can subsequently be reviewed quickly or one by one.

Results:

Memory for a significant event was improved substantially when tested after 4.5 weeks, if the patient viewed SenseCam images of the event every 2 days for 3 weeks. In contrast, after only 3.5 weeks, her memory was at chance levels for a similarly significant event which was reviewed equally often, but using a written diary. During the fMRI scan, the patient viewed images of these two events, plus images of an unrehearsed event and images from a novel “control” event that she had never experienced. There was no difference in behavioural responses or in activation when the unrehearsed and novel conditions were compared. Relative to the written-rehearsed condition, successful recognition of the images in the SenseCam-rehearsed condition was associated with activation of frontal and posterior cortical regions associated with normal episodic memory.

Conclusion:

SenseCam images may provide powerful cues that trigger the recall and consolidation of stored but inaccessible memories.
1468-330X
1202-1205
Berry, E.
0e183161-9b42-440c-9e16-900f4a51c12f
Hampshire, A.
5c2c894c-8659-4ba6-aa15-6b912f032e24
Rowe, J.
8327d988-6352-46f8-b465-d12755d89ed2
Hodges, S.
cf29a42e-ab11-420f-819a-dbc77d063c2f
Kapur, N.
f713a6d9-5625-4492-81fb-75801b6cb12a
Watson, P.
6c8b1e44-51ef-4f63-b4b4-307cdfbe7aa6
Browne, G.
34c7ad18-bc99-4b1c-929b-5c03355fcda0
Smyth, G.
e6aec403-f961-4b89-bbff-acba0c16c283
Wood, K.
54fae213-123e-44e3-a59f-0fdfde605a04
Owen, A M
fc95c547-3323-475a-967a-fd3070c423c9
Berry, E.
0e183161-9b42-440c-9e16-900f4a51c12f
Hampshire, A.
5c2c894c-8659-4ba6-aa15-6b912f032e24
Rowe, J.
8327d988-6352-46f8-b465-d12755d89ed2
Hodges, S.
cf29a42e-ab11-420f-819a-dbc77d063c2f
Kapur, N.
f713a6d9-5625-4492-81fb-75801b6cb12a
Watson, P.
6c8b1e44-51ef-4f63-b4b4-307cdfbe7aa6
Browne, G.
34c7ad18-bc99-4b1c-929b-5c03355fcda0
Smyth, G.
e6aec403-f961-4b89-bbff-acba0c16c283
Wood, K.
54fae213-123e-44e3-a59f-0fdfde605a04
Owen, A M
fc95c547-3323-475a-967a-fd3070c423c9

Berry, E., Hampshire, A., Rowe, J., Hodges, S., Kapur, N., Watson, P., Browne, G., Smyth, G., Wood, K. and Owen, A M (2009) The neural basis of effective memory therapy in a patient with limbic encephalitis. Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 80 (11), 1202-1205. (doi:10.1136/jnnp.2008.164251).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background:

An fMRI study is described in which a postencephalitic woman with amnesia used a wearable camera which takes photographs passively, without user intervention, to record and review recent autobiographical events. “SenseCam” generates hundreds of images which can subsequently be reviewed quickly or one by one.

Results:

Memory for a significant event was improved substantially when tested after 4.5 weeks, if the patient viewed SenseCam images of the event every 2 days for 3 weeks. In contrast, after only 3.5 weeks, her memory was at chance levels for a similarly significant event which was reviewed equally often, but using a written diary. During the fMRI scan, the patient viewed images of these two events, plus images of an unrehearsed event and images from a novel “control” event that she had never experienced. There was no difference in behavioural responses or in activation when the unrehearsed and novel conditions were compared. Relative to the written-rehearsed condition, successful recognition of the images in the SenseCam-rehearsed condition was associated with activation of frontal and posterior cortical regions associated with normal episodic memory.

Conclusion:

SenseCam images may provide powerful cues that trigger the recall and consolidation of stored but inaccessible memories.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: December 2009

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 156705
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/156705
ISSN: 1468-330X
PURE UUID: 911177dc-47d4-4f52-bfcc-43beb07c5288

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Jun 2010 14:18
Last modified: 01 Oct 2018 16:33

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