The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Survival of gastric and enterohepatic Helicobacter spp. in water: implications for transmission

Survival of gastric and enterohepatic Helicobacter spp. in water: implications for transmission
Survival of gastric and enterohepatic Helicobacter spp. in water: implications for transmission
Part of the reason for rejecting aquatic environments as possible vectors for the transmission of Helicobacter pylori has been the preference of this microorganism to inhabit the human stomach and hence use a direct oral-oral route for transmission. On the other hand, most enteric bacterial pathogens are well known for being able to use water as an environmental reservoir. In this work, we have exposed 13 strains of seven different Helicobacter spp. (both gastric and enterohepatic) to water and tracked their survival by standard plating methods and membrane integrity assessment. The influence of different plating media and temperatures and the presence of light on recovery was also assessed. There was good correlation between cultivability and membrane integrity results (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.916), confirming that the culture method could reliably estimate differences in survival among different Helicobacter spp. The species that survived the longest in water was H. pylori (>96 h in the dark at 25°C), whereas H. felis appeared to be the most sensitive to water (<6 h). A hierarchical cluster analysis demonstrated that there was no relationship between the enterohepatic nature of Helicobacter spp. and an increased time of survival in water. This work assesses for the first time the survival of multiple Helicobacter spp., such has H. mustelae, H. muridarum, H. felis, H. canadensis, H. pullorum, and H. canis, in water under several conditions and concludes that the roles of water in transmission between hosts are likely to be similar for all these species, whether enterohepatic or not.
0099-2240
1805-1811
Azevedo, N.F.
c90d7c41-e45a-404d-9472-9d0b411448e7
Almeida, C.
0a572983-c36b-40c3-bfc4-98e84b2bfda9
Fernandes, I.
6daae057-06bb-4234-99d3-de959c4e8788
Cerqueira, L.
9f86a3e3-844a-4480-ac6a-d145026cf2cf
Dias, S.
1975326d-99dd-4977-90fa-c7ccf3eb086f
Keevil, C.W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Vieira, M.J.
b13909e0-b086-49fc-b589-3fb9d2a02577
Azevedo, N.F.
c90d7c41-e45a-404d-9472-9d0b411448e7
Almeida, C.
0a572983-c36b-40c3-bfc4-98e84b2bfda9
Fernandes, I.
6daae057-06bb-4234-99d3-de959c4e8788
Cerqueira, L.
9f86a3e3-844a-4480-ac6a-d145026cf2cf
Dias, S.
1975326d-99dd-4977-90fa-c7ccf3eb086f
Keevil, C.W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Vieira, M.J.
b13909e0-b086-49fc-b589-3fb9d2a02577

Azevedo, N.F., Almeida, C., Fernandes, I., Cerqueira, L., Dias, S., Keevil, C.W. and Vieira, M.J. (2008) Survival of gastric and enterohepatic Helicobacter spp. in water: implications for transmission. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 74 (6), 1805-1811. (doi:10.1128/AEM.02241-07).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Part of the reason for rejecting aquatic environments as possible vectors for the transmission of Helicobacter pylori has been the preference of this microorganism to inhabit the human stomach and hence use a direct oral-oral route for transmission. On the other hand, most enteric bacterial pathogens are well known for being able to use water as an environmental reservoir. In this work, we have exposed 13 strains of seven different Helicobacter spp. (both gastric and enterohepatic) to water and tracked their survival by standard plating methods and membrane integrity assessment. The influence of different plating media and temperatures and the presence of light on recovery was also assessed. There was good correlation between cultivability and membrane integrity results (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.916), confirming that the culture method could reliably estimate differences in survival among different Helicobacter spp. The species that survived the longest in water was H. pylori (>96 h in the dark at 25°C), whereas H. felis appeared to be the most sensitive to water (<6 h). A hierarchical cluster analysis demonstrated that there was no relationship between the enterohepatic nature of Helicobacter spp. and an increased time of survival in water. This work assesses for the first time the survival of multiple Helicobacter spp., such has H. mustelae, H. muridarum, H. felis, H. canadensis, H. pullorum, and H. canis, in water under several conditions and concludes that the roles of water in transmission between hosts are likely to be similar for all these species, whether enterohepatic or not.

Text
Keevil_2008-07.pdf - Version of Record
Download (536kB)

More information

Published date: March 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 157187
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/157187
ISSN: 0099-2240
PURE UUID: 585eee77-83c9-4757-adfb-8e95193e6913
ORCID for C.W. Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Jun 2010 09:10
Last modified: 12 Nov 2019 01:51

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×