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Are Muslim immigrants different in terms of cultural integration?

Are Muslim immigrants different in terms of cultural integration?
Are Muslim immigrants different in terms of cultural integration?
Using the UK Fourth National Survey of Ethnic Minorities, we explore the determinants of religious identity for Muslims and non-Muslims. We find that Muslims integrate less and more slowly than non-Muslims. A Muslim born in the UK and having spent there more than 50 years shows a comparable level of probability of having a strong religious identity than a non- Muslim just arrived in the country. Furthermore, Muslims seem to follow a different integration pattern than other ethnic and religious minorities. Specifically, high levels of income as well as high on-the-job qualifications increase the Muslims’ sense of identity. We also find no evidence that segregated neighborhoods breed intense religious and cultural identities for ethnic minorities, especially for Muslims. This result casts doubts on the foundations of the integration policies in Europe.
religious identity, assimilation, muslims
1542-4766
445-456
Bisin, Alberto
0c6bf792-b31f-4b6a-a048-04d97b05a6b6
Patacchini, Eleonora
42a2cbc9-016c-43f2-a9e9-e2f00172d919
Verdier, Thierry
87c483ea-f473-408f-9776-d0381cab6454
Zenou, Yves
f7c3b72f-b6b6-4550-8b0f-00a127af082e
Bisin, Alberto
0c6bf792-b31f-4b6a-a048-04d97b05a6b6
Patacchini, Eleonora
42a2cbc9-016c-43f2-a9e9-e2f00172d919
Verdier, Thierry
87c483ea-f473-408f-9776-d0381cab6454
Zenou, Yves
f7c3b72f-b6b6-4550-8b0f-00a127af082e

Bisin, Alberto, Patacchini, Eleonora, Verdier, Thierry and Zenou, Yves (2008) Are Muslim immigrants different in terms of cultural integration? Journal of the European Economic Association, 6 (2-3), 445-456. (doi:10.1162/JEEA.2008.6.2-3.445).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Using the UK Fourth National Survey of Ethnic Minorities, we explore the determinants of religious identity for Muslims and non-Muslims. We find that Muslims integrate less and more slowly than non-Muslims. A Muslim born in the UK and having spent there more than 50 years shows a comparable level of probability of having a strong religious identity than a non- Muslim just arrived in the country. Furthermore, Muslims seem to follow a different integration pattern than other ethnic and religious minorities. Specifically, high levels of income as well as high on-the-job qualifications increase the Muslims’ sense of identity. We also find no evidence that segregated neighborhoods breed intense religious and cultural identities for ethnic minorities, especially for Muslims. This result casts doubts on the foundations of the integration policies in Europe.

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Published date: 13 May 2008
Keywords: religious identity, assimilation, muslims

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 157437
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/157437
ISSN: 1542-4766
PURE UUID: 25959cf5-1d9b-43f4-8ff0-43d3df62bf68

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Date deposited: 07 Jun 2010 11:58
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:56

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