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Understanding the social geography of census undercount

Understanding the social geography of census undercount
Understanding the social geography of census undercount
A new round of censuses is being held internationally in 2010 – 11 in the face of increasing challenges to the achievement of high coverage rates. Censuses are of enormous importance due to the extensive range of planning and analysis which is dependent on the accuracy of their results. Despite efforts to assess quality and make corrections, there is still evidence of population missing from published estimates. This paper uses administratively based data sources to assess probable undercount in the 2001 Census of England and Wales, specifically seeking to understand the differences between the census and alternative sources. It presents new evidence of strong social and spatial concentrations, only some of which have been addressed by official adjustments to the census. It is important both that these issues are taken into account in substantive research using published small area data and that the underlying processes are much more clearly understood by users and reviewers of the 2010 – 11 round of censuses.
0308-518X
2753-2770
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f

Martin, David (2010) Understanding the social geography of census undercount. Environment and Planning A, 42 (11), 2753-2770.

Record type: Article

Abstract

A new round of censuses is being held internationally in 2010 – 11 in the face of increasing challenges to the achievement of high coverage rates. Censuses are of enormous importance due to the extensive range of planning and analysis which is dependent on the accuracy of their results. Despite efforts to assess quality and make corrections, there is still evidence of population missing from published estimates. This paper uses administratively based data sources to assess probable undercount in the 2001 Census of England and Wales, specifically seeking to understand the differences between the census and alternative sources. It presents new evidence of strong social and spatial concentrations, only some of which have been addressed by official adjustments to the census. It is important both that these issues are taken into account in substantive research using published small area data and that the underlying processes are much more clearly understood by users and reviewers of the 2010 – 11 round of censuses.

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More information

Published date: 2010
Organisations: Geography, PHEW – P (Population Health), PHEW – S (Spatial analysis and modelling)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 158153
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/158153
ISSN: 0308-518X
PURE UUID: 45492378-01dc-493b-9d7f-d079a6849bd5
ORCID for David Martin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0397-0769

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jun 2010 08:06
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:09

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