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Do all systems age together?

Do all systems age together?
Do all systems age together?
Background: Aging changes in different body system are well described, but few studies have considered the relationship between them. Objective: The purpose of this study was, therefore, to investigate the interrelationships between markers of aging in different parts of the body. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used. Structural and functional markers of aging were measured in a number of different body systems. Results: Conditional independence analysis demonstrated that the aging markers selected clustered into two groups, either related to chronological age or adult height. Visual acuity, lens opacity, hearing threshold, cognitive decline, and the number of teeth were associated with age, while systolic blood pressure and skin thickness were related to height. Grip strength was associated with both. Conclusions: The differential associations of the aging markers with chronological age and adult height suggest that different systems do not age together. This may have relevance for understanding what underlies aging, and these preliminary findings now require replication in other aging cohorts.
0304-324X
83-86
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Osmond, C.
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Briggs, R.
6181bb2b-07eb-4850-aabc-d106f13a39b0
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Osmond, C.
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Briggs, R.
6181bb2b-07eb-4850-aabc-d106f13a39b0
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6

Aihie Sayer, A., Osmond, C., Briggs, R. and Cooper, C. (1999) Do all systems age together? Gerontology, 45 (2), 83-86. (doi:10.1159/000022068).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Aging changes in different body system are well described, but few studies have considered the relationship between them. Objective: The purpose of this study was, therefore, to investigate the interrelationships between markers of aging in different parts of the body. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used. Structural and functional markers of aging were measured in a number of different body systems. Results: Conditional independence analysis demonstrated that the aging markers selected clustered into two groups, either related to chronological age or adult height. Visual acuity, lens opacity, hearing threshold, cognitive decline, and the number of teeth were associated with age, while systolic blood pressure and skin thickness were related to height. Grip strength was associated with both. Conclusions: The differential associations of the aging markers with chronological age and adult height suggest that different systems do not age together. This may have relevance for understanding what underlies aging, and these preliminary findings now require replication in other aging cohorts.

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Published date: 1999

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 159719
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/159719
ISSN: 0304-324X
PURE UUID: 3e7776a3-11b5-4dbc-8786-fff1d98d08cf
ORCID for C. Osmond: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9054-4655
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 07 Jul 2010 14:20
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:31

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Contributors

Author: A. Aihie Sayer
Author: C. Osmond ORCID iD
Author: R. Briggs
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD

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