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The perceived stress reactivity scale: measurement invariance, stability and validity in three countries

The perceived stress reactivity scale: measurement invariance, stability and validity in three countries
The perceived stress reactivity scale: measurement invariance, stability and validity in three countries
There is accumulating evidence that individual differences in stress reactivity contribute to the risk for stress-related disease. However, the assessment of stress reactivity remains challenging, and there is a relative lack of questionnaires reliably assessing this construct. Based on an existing German-language instrument, we here present the Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale (PSRS), a 23-item questionnaire with five subscales and one overall scale. Perceived stress reactivity and related constructs were assessed in N = 2,040 participants from the United Kingdom, the United States, and Germany. The 5-factor structure of the PSRS was found to be similar in the three countries. In the US sample the questionnaire was applied using two modes of administration (paper-pencil and computerized), and measures were repeated after four weeks. Measurement invariance analyses demonstrated full invariance across mode of administration, and partial invariance across gender and countries. Scale scores differed between countries and genders, with women scoring higher on most scales. Overall, reliability analysis suggested good stability of PSRS scores over a 4-week period, and validation analysis showed expected associations with related constructs such as self-efficacy, neuroticism, chronic stress and perceived stress. Perceived stress reactivity was also associated with depressive symptoms and sleep. These associations were particularly strong when individuals scoring high on perceived stress reactivity were exposed to chronic stress. In sum, our findings suggest that the PSRS is a useful and easy to administer instrument to assess perceived stress reactivity.
1040-3590
80-94
Schlotz, Wolff
49499d5e-4ff4-4ad3-b5f7-eec11b25b5db
Yim, Ilona S.
76bc9e32-5611-46fa-801c-a30de6166255
Zoccola, Peggy M.
8d115a90-a702-49ae-b140-4ec59cecdb99
Jansen, Lars
7defb135-a3c2-4913-9405-faf09aad7101
Schulz, Peter
215dfa50-7034-453c-8f9b-f4bf76e0164c
Schlotz, Wolff
49499d5e-4ff4-4ad3-b5f7-eec11b25b5db
Yim, Ilona S.
76bc9e32-5611-46fa-801c-a30de6166255
Zoccola, Peggy M.
8d115a90-a702-49ae-b140-4ec59cecdb99
Jansen, Lars
7defb135-a3c2-4913-9405-faf09aad7101
Schulz, Peter
215dfa50-7034-453c-8f9b-f4bf76e0164c

Schlotz, Wolff, Yim, Ilona S., Zoccola, Peggy M., Jansen, Lars and Schulz, Peter (2011) The perceived stress reactivity scale: measurement invariance, stability and validity in three countries. Psychological Assessment, 23 (1), 80-94. (doi:10.1037/a0021148). (PMID:21280954)

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is accumulating evidence that individual differences in stress reactivity contribute to the risk for stress-related disease. However, the assessment of stress reactivity remains challenging, and there is a relative lack of questionnaires reliably assessing this construct. Based on an existing German-language instrument, we here present the Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale (PSRS), a 23-item questionnaire with five subscales and one overall scale. Perceived stress reactivity and related constructs were assessed in N = 2,040 participants from the United Kingdom, the United States, and Germany. The 5-factor structure of the PSRS was found to be similar in the three countries. In the US sample the questionnaire was applied using two modes of administration (paper-pencil and computerized), and measures were repeated after four weeks. Measurement invariance analyses demonstrated full invariance across mode of administration, and partial invariance across gender and countries. Scale scores differed between countries and genders, with women scoring higher on most scales. Overall, reliability analysis suggested good stability of PSRS scores over a 4-week period, and validation analysis showed expected associations with related constructs such as self-efficacy, neuroticism, chronic stress and perceived stress. Perceived stress reactivity was also associated with depressive symptoms and sleep. These associations were particularly strong when individuals scoring high on perceived stress reactivity were exposed to chronic stress. In sum, our findings suggest that the PSRS is a useful and easy to administer instrument to assess perceived stress reactivity.

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Published date: March 2011

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 160613
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/160613
ISSN: 1040-3590
PURE UUID: ad93dfd5-1afe-4d14-8f0e-97ad95c5f3b1

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Date deposited: 21 Jul 2010 08:43
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:35

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