The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

'Dividing the desolation': clients views on the benefits of a cancer counselling service

'Dividing the desolation': clients views on the benefits of a cancer counselling service
'Dividing the desolation': clients views on the benefits of a cancer counselling service
This paper describes clients' accounts of the benefits they derived from a short course of cancer counselling provided within a humanist framework. Three hundred and two clients who had attended at least one session of a short course of cancer counselling received an evaluation form, which incorporated both fixed-choice and open-ended questions. One hundred and forty two (47%) clients returned evaluation forms; those who had attended more sessions were significantly more likely to do so. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) for Windows and qualitative data using a thematic approach. Almost all clients indicated that they felt they had benefited from counselling. Analysis of the open-ended questions identified nine main benefits of counselling and four key avenues or processes through which clients derived these benefits. Overall, counselling was seen as helping them to work through powerful thoughts and feelings and so to come to terms with cancer and to regain a sense of control in their lives. The benefits of a short course of counselling which clients identified reflect the aims of humanistic counselling which are not well captured by psychiatric assessments or most standard research instruments. In evaluating cancer counselling services, assessments which include these client-defined outcomes may provide a more sensitive way of gauging the value of counselling to a non-clinic population.
124-136
Boulton, Mary
92b1dcba-36f3-49f9-959f-1d1af4576afd
Boudioni, Markella
09197917-3b67-45f6-87a0-a564d6c80a1c
Mossman, Jean
a2be1028-7595-4e92-b268-b6ca8711d658
Moynihan, Clare
5830406c-b68c-4ec6-ac83-833c2af9b095
Leydon, Geraldine
c5cdaff5-0fa1-4d38-b575-b97c2892ec40
Ramirez, Amanda
19645e6a-39e8-459b-8b4a-d5a37c679bd9
Boulton, Mary
92b1dcba-36f3-49f9-959f-1d1af4576afd
Boudioni, Markella
09197917-3b67-45f6-87a0-a564d6c80a1c
Mossman, Jean
a2be1028-7595-4e92-b268-b6ca8711d658
Moynihan, Clare
5830406c-b68c-4ec6-ac83-833c2af9b095
Leydon, Geraldine
c5cdaff5-0fa1-4d38-b575-b97c2892ec40
Ramirez, Amanda
19645e6a-39e8-459b-8b4a-d5a37c679bd9

Boulton, Mary, Boudioni, Markella, Mossman, Jean, Moynihan, Clare, Leydon, Geraldine and Ramirez, Amanda (2001) 'Dividing the desolation': clients views on the benefits of a cancer counselling service. Psycho-Oncology, 10 (2), 124-136. (doi:10.1002/pon.494).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper describes clients' accounts of the benefits they derived from a short course of cancer counselling provided within a humanist framework. Three hundred and two clients who had attended at least one session of a short course of cancer counselling received an evaluation form, which incorporated both fixed-choice and open-ended questions. One hundred and forty two (47%) clients returned evaluation forms; those who had attended more sessions were significantly more likely to do so. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) for Windows and qualitative data using a thematic approach. Almost all clients indicated that they felt they had benefited from counselling. Analysis of the open-ended questions identified nine main benefits of counselling and four key avenues or processes through which clients derived these benefits. Overall, counselling was seen as helping them to work through powerful thoughts and feelings and so to come to terms with cancer and to regain a sense of control in their lives. The benefits of a short course of counselling which clients identified reflect the aims of humanistic counselling which are not well captured by psychiatric assessments or most standard research instruments. In evaluating cancer counselling services, assessments which include these client-defined outcomes may provide a more sensitive way of gauging the value of counselling to a non-clinic population.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 7 March 2001

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 161209
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/161209
PURE UUID: e3379e36-ead6-4d2f-b86c-5935e79ebf29
ORCID for Geraldine Leydon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5986-3300

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Jul 2010 09:15
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:54

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Mary Boulton
Author: Markella Boudioni
Author: Jean Mossman
Author: Clare Moynihan
Author: Amanda Ramirez

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×