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Risperidone long-acting injection: factors associated with changes in bed stay and hospitalisation in a 3-year naturalistic follow-up

Risperidone long-acting injection: factors associated with changes in bed stay and hospitalisation in a 3-year naturalistic follow-up
Risperidone long-acting injection: factors associated with changes in bed stay and hospitalisation in a 3-year naturalistic follow-up
We examined factors associated with hospital admissions and bed stay for 211 patients prescribed risperidone long-acting injection (RLAI) in clinical practice. Hospital bed days increased by a median of 74 days in the 3 years after RLAI initiation compared with the 3 years before initiation (P < 0.0001). Only subjects starting RLAI as outpatients showed no increase in bed days after RLAI initiation. A greater than expected number of bed days was observed in women (36% increase), patients prescribed >25 mg/2 weeks (70% increase) and patients previously treated with clozapine (118% increase). Overall, number of hospital admissions did not increase, although those previously prescribed clozapine saw a 31% increase in admissions compared with patients not previously exposed to clozapine. This and other analyses of the same patient cohort indicate that RLAI produces most favourable outcomes in outpatients and those not previously treated with clozapine
995-999
Cornelius, Victoria
b75c21d7-2c25-495c-9107-e39453a72bdd
Taylor, D.
238e3500-b412-4f97-a9c2-d6195a01a0df
Cornelius, Victoria
b75c21d7-2c25-495c-9107-e39453a72bdd
Taylor, D.
238e3500-b412-4f97-a9c2-d6195a01a0df

Cornelius, Victoria and Taylor, D. (2010) Risperidone long-acting injection: factors associated with changes in bed stay and hospitalisation in a 3-year naturalistic follow-up. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 24 (7), 995-999. (doi:10.1177/0269881109102611).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We examined factors associated with hospital admissions and bed stay for 211 patients prescribed risperidone long-acting injection (RLAI) in clinical practice. Hospital bed days increased by a median of 74 days in the 3 years after RLAI initiation compared with the 3 years before initiation (P < 0.0001). Only subjects starting RLAI as outpatients showed no increase in bed days after RLAI initiation. A greater than expected number of bed days was observed in women (36% increase), patients prescribed >25 mg/2 weeks (70% increase) and patients previously treated with clozapine (118% increase). Overall, number of hospital admissions did not increase, although those previously prescribed clozapine saw a 31% increase in admissions compared with patients not previously exposed to clozapine. This and other analyses of the same patient cohort indicate that RLAI produces most favourable outcomes in outpatients and those not previously treated with clozapine

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Published date: 10 July 2010

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Local EPrints ID: 162019
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/162019
PURE UUID: ab0d5787-e778-491f-bcec-1d6c1a46e618

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Date deposited: 12 Aug 2010 09:14
Last modified: 07 Jan 2022 21:02

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Contributors

Author: Victoria Cornelius
Author: D. Taylor

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