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Types of centredness in health care: themes and concepts

Types of centredness in health care: themes and concepts
Types of centredness in health care: themes and concepts
Background: for a variety of sociological reasons, different types of centredness have become important in health and social care. In trying to characterize one type of centredness, we were led to consider, at a conceptual level, the importance of the notion of centredness in general and the reasons for there being different types of centeredness.

Method: we searched the literature for papers on client-, family-, patient-, person- and relationship- centred care. We identified reviews or papers that defined or discussed the notions at a conceptual level. The reviews and papers were analyzed as text transcripts.

Results: we identified 10 themes that were common to all the types of centredness. At a conceptual level we could not identify thematic differences between the types of centredness. These findings were subjected to a philosophical critique using ideas derived from Wittgenstein.

Conclusion: different types of centredness are required in different contexts. The differences are justified by their practical utility. The unifying themes of centredness, however, reflect a movement in favour of increasing the social, psychological, cultural and ethical sensitivity of our human encounters
1386-7423
455-463
Hughes, Julian C.
eb1e6241-bab7-4b18-af2f-cf5e3077bf3a
Bamford, Claire
3bc4f918-dec2-4657-9fd8-693b6a2759b0
May, Carl
17697f8d-98f6-40d3-9cc0-022f04009ae4
Hughes, Julian C.
eb1e6241-bab7-4b18-af2f-cf5e3077bf3a
Bamford, Claire
3bc4f918-dec2-4657-9fd8-693b6a2759b0
May, Carl
17697f8d-98f6-40d3-9cc0-022f04009ae4

Hughes, Julian C., Bamford, Claire and May, Carl (2008) Types of centredness in health care: themes and concepts. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, 11 (4), 455-463. (doi:10.1007/s11019-008-9131-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: for a variety of sociological reasons, different types of centredness have become important in health and social care. In trying to characterize one type of centredness, we were led to consider, at a conceptual level, the importance of the notion of centredness in general and the reasons for there being different types of centeredness.

Method: we searched the literature for papers on client-, family-, patient-, person- and relationship- centred care. We identified reviews or papers that defined or discussed the notions at a conceptual level. The reviews and papers were analyzed as text transcripts.

Results: we identified 10 themes that were common to all the types of centredness. At a conceptual level we could not identify thematic differences between the types of centredness. These findings were subjected to a philosophical critique using ideas derived from Wittgenstein.

Conclusion: different types of centredness are required in different contexts. The differences are justified by their practical utility. The unifying themes of centredness, however, reflect a movement in favour of increasing the social, psychological, cultural and ethical sensitivity of our human encounters

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Published date: 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 163587
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/163587
ISSN: 1386-7423
PURE UUID: 12259e70-ebdf-4ee5-836a-dae0dd22f004
ORCID for Carl May: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0451-2690

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Date deposited: 13 Sep 2010 10:44
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:41

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