The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Domains of consultation research in primary care

Domains of consultation research in primary care
Domains of consultation research in primary care
The consultation is increasingly viewed as a crucial aspect of general practice medicine, but a variety of methods of conceptualising, describing and modifying its structure and content have been described. This article describes the historical background to the current interest in the consultation, and describes four qualitatively distinct approaches (or ‘domains’) to understanding the consultation: the psychodynamic; clinical–observational; social–psychological; and sociological. Four key dimensions along which the domains can be differentiated are described. These concern whether the critique of medical practice inherent in the domain is internal or external to the discipline of general practice; whether the focus of the domain is on the consultation participants’ identities or activities; whether the key research methodology is quantitative or qualitative in character; and the degree to which the objective of research within the domain is to describe current practice or prescribe ways of conducting the consultation. Methods of encouraging work across domains are discussed
primary care, doctor–patient relationship, disciplinary perspectives
0738-3991
3-11
Bower, Peter
ec553157-a170-4219-8b55-2df813846e44
Gask, Linda
9805a757-54f2-400c-b3f4-b5cc277df509
May, Carl
17697f8d-98f6-40d3-9cc0-022f04009ae4
Mead, Nicola
b8463f8d-fad8-48f7-a569-2dfc7ff9e2c7
Bower, Peter
ec553157-a170-4219-8b55-2df813846e44
Gask, Linda
9805a757-54f2-400c-b3f4-b5cc277df509
May, Carl
17697f8d-98f6-40d3-9cc0-022f04009ae4
Mead, Nicola
b8463f8d-fad8-48f7-a569-2dfc7ff9e2c7

Bower, Peter, Gask, Linda, May, Carl and Mead, Nicola (2001) Domains of consultation research in primary care. Patient Education and Counseling, 45 (1), 3-11. (doi:10.1016/S0738-3991(01)00117-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The consultation is increasingly viewed as a crucial aspect of general practice medicine, but a variety of methods of conceptualising, describing and modifying its structure and content have been described. This article describes the historical background to the current interest in the consultation, and describes four qualitatively distinct approaches (or ‘domains’) to understanding the consultation: the psychodynamic; clinical–observational; social–psychological; and sociological. Four key dimensions along which the domains can be differentiated are described. These concern whether the critique of medical practice inherent in the domain is internal or external to the discipline of general practice; whether the focus of the domain is on the consultation participants’ identities or activities; whether the key research methodology is quantitative or qualitative in character; and the degree to which the objective of research within the domain is to describe current practice or prescribe ways of conducting the consultation. Methods of encouraging work across domains are discussed

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: October 2001
Keywords: primary care, doctor–patient relationship, disciplinary perspectives
Organisations: Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 163675
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/163675
ISSN: 0738-3991
PURE UUID: 815829df-a399-4603-a2a3-fe47cb3a7dda
ORCID for Carl May: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0451-2690

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Sep 2010 08:24
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 00:46

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×