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Temperature-driven biogeography of the deep-sea family Lithodidae (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) in the Southern Ocean

Temperature-driven biogeography of the deep-sea family Lithodidae (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) in the Southern Ocean
Temperature-driven biogeography of the deep-sea family Lithodidae (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) in the Southern Ocean
Species’ distributions are dynamic and are linked to the changing physical environment. Temperature is considered to be a major factor influencing biogeography, especially in ectotherms such as the family Lithodidae. Lithodids are rare amongst decapods in their ability to inhabit the higher latitudes of the Southern Ocean; however, they are usually found in locations where water temperature is above 0.5°C. This study, for the first time, provides a baseline indication of the limits of the lithodid distribution around Antarctica, which will be instrumental in any future work on range extensions in this group. The distribution of lithodids is likely to change as temperatures along the West Antarctic Peninsula continue to rise, and range extensions by durophagous predators, such as the lithodids, are regarded as a potential threat to the unique structure of Antarctic continental-shelf ecosystems.
0722-4060
363-370
Hall, S.
a11a8f8b-d6fb-47a7-82b1-1f76d2f170dc
Thatje, S.
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Hall, S.
a11a8f8b-d6fb-47a7-82b1-1f76d2f170dc
Thatje, S.
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533

Hall, S. and Thatje, S. (2011) Temperature-driven biogeography of the deep-sea family Lithodidae (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) in the Southern Ocean. Polar Biology, 34, 363-370. (doi:10.1007/s00300-010-0890-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Species’ distributions are dynamic and are linked to the changing physical environment. Temperature is considered to be a major factor influencing biogeography, especially in ectotherms such as the family Lithodidae. Lithodids are rare amongst decapods in their ability to inhabit the higher latitudes of the Southern Ocean; however, they are usually found in locations where water temperature is above 0.5°C. This study, for the first time, provides a baseline indication of the limits of the lithodid distribution around Antarctica, which will be instrumental in any future work on range extensions in this group. The distribution of lithodids is likely to change as temperatures along the West Antarctic Peninsula continue to rise, and range extensions by durophagous predators, such as the lithodids, are regarded as a potential threat to the unique structure of Antarctic continental-shelf ecosystems.

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Published date: 18 March 2011

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 165973
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/165973
ISSN: 0722-4060
PURE UUID: dbab7e8b-7009-4326-9803-db5e011a1f6c

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Date deposited: 21 Oct 2010 12:23
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 20:51

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