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Structural performance of a multifunctional spacecraft structure based on plastic lithium-ion batteries

Structural performance of a multifunctional spacecraft structure based on plastic lithium-ion batteries
Structural performance of a multifunctional spacecraft structure based on plastic lithium-ion batteries
A multifunctional structure reduces the mass and volume of a spacecraft through the removal of parasitic components of a functional structure, such as the purely structural “packaging” of the battery. Commercially available cells, of the plastic lithium-ion type, may be incorporated into structural sandwich panels, eliminating the need for a secondary structure in the battery subsystem. Locating the cells in the structure also removes them from the bus, which reduces the volume of the craft and, consequently, reduces the mass of the primary structure. Although the batteries studied in this work exhibited low mechanical properties, this paper will show that, by placing the cells carefully within the sandwich panel, structural performance is not compromised. Finite element models show a reduction in peak stress and deformation in multifunctional panels, compared to a conventional design, when a favourable layout is selected. Less conclusive results for peak acceleration, however, suggest that this type of multifunctional structure may not be appropriate for all applications. Comparison of the finite element modelling technique with a real panel's behaviour shows that the deformation and stress predicted by the model is consistent with reality, whilst the acceleration is reliable for low frequencies.

structural engineering, electrical batteries, multifunctional structures
0094-5765
424-439
Aglietti, G.S.
e44d0dd4-0f71-4399-93d2-b802365cfb9e
Roberts, S.C.
7bd2b67d-960b-4040-81ed-8ac07ba9f113
Aglietti, G.S.
e44d0dd4-0f71-4399-93d2-b802365cfb9e
Roberts, S.C.
7bd2b67d-960b-4040-81ed-8ac07ba9f113

Aglietti, G.S. and Roberts, S.C. (2010) Structural performance of a multifunctional spacecraft structure based on plastic lithium-ion batteries. Acta Astronautica, 67 (3-4), 424-439. (doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2010.03.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A multifunctional structure reduces the mass and volume of a spacecraft through the removal of parasitic components of a functional structure, such as the purely structural “packaging” of the battery. Commercially available cells, of the plastic lithium-ion type, may be incorporated into structural sandwich panels, eliminating the need for a secondary structure in the battery subsystem. Locating the cells in the structure also removes them from the bus, which reduces the volume of the craft and, consequently, reduces the mass of the primary structure. Although the batteries studied in this work exhibited low mechanical properties, this paper will show that, by placing the cells carefully within the sandwich panel, structural performance is not compromised. Finite element models show a reduction in peak stress and deformation in multifunctional panels, compared to a conventional design, when a favourable layout is selected. Less conclusive results for peak acceleration, however, suggest that this type of multifunctional structure may not be appropriate for all applications. Comparison of the finite element modelling technique with a real panel's behaviour shows that the deformation and stress predicted by the model is consistent with reality, whilst the acceleration is reliable for low frequencies.

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More information

Published date: August 2010
Keywords: structural engineering, electrical batteries, multifunctional structures

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 167833
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/167833
ISSN: 0094-5765
PURE UUID: c69a155f-0880-4412-ba6a-78b80539f2b3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Nov 2010 09:16
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:50

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