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Is satisfaction a direct predictor of nursing turnover?: Modelling the relationship between satisfaction, expressed intention and behaviour in a longitudinal cohort study.

Is satisfaction a direct predictor of nursing turnover?: Modelling the relationship between satisfaction, expressed intention and behaviour in a longitudinal cohort study.
Is satisfaction a direct predictor of nursing turnover?: Modelling the relationship between satisfaction, expressed intention and behaviour in a longitudinal cohort study.
Background: The theory of planned behaviour states that attitudinal variables (e.g. job satisfaction) only have an indirect effect on retention whereas intentions have a direct effect. This study uses secondary data from a longitudinal cohort of newly qualified nurses to test for the direct and indirect effects of job satisfaction (client care, staffing, development, relationships, education, work-life interface, resources, pay) and intentions to nurse on working as a nurse during the 3 years after qualification.

Method: A national sample (England) of newly qualified (1997/98) nurses (n = 3669) were surveyed at 6 months, 18 months and 3 years. ANOVA and MANOVA were used for comparison of mean job satisfaction scores between groups; intentions to nurse (very likely, likely vs. unlikely, very unlikely and unable to say at this stage); working (or not working as a nurse) at each time-point. Indirect and direct effects were tested using structural equation and logistic regression models.

Results: Intentions expressed at 6 months to nurse at 18 months were associated with higher scores on pay and relationships, and intentions at 3 years were associated with higher scores on care, development, relationships, work-life interface, resources, pay respectively. Intentions expressed at 18 months to nurse at 3 years were associated with higher scores on development, relationships, education and work-life interface. Associations with actual nursing were fewer. Those working as a nurse had higher satisfaction scores for development (18 months) and relationships (3 years). Regression models found significant associations between the pay and staffing factors and intentions expressed at 6 months to nurse at 18 months, and between pay and intentions to nurse at 3 years. Many of the associations between intentions and working as a nurse were significant. Development was the only job satisfaction factor significantly associated with working as a nurse and just at 18 months.

Conclusion: Results partially support the theory of planned behaviour. Intentions expressed by nurses are stronger predictors of working as a nurse than job satisfaction. Retention strategies should focus on identifying nurses showing early signs of departure with emphasis on developmental aspects, mentoring and support.



1478-4491
22
Murrells, Trevor
9a57589a-d893-415c-8c3d-8b25d052f42c
Robinson, Sarah
98c11811-e2f2-4cce-afe8-b68376668087
Griffiths, Peter
ac7afec1-7d72-4b83-b016-3a43e245265b
Murrells, Trevor
9a57589a-d893-415c-8c3d-8b25d052f42c
Robinson, Sarah
98c11811-e2f2-4cce-afe8-b68376668087
Griffiths, Peter
ac7afec1-7d72-4b83-b016-3a43e245265b

Murrells, Trevor, Robinson, Sarah and Griffiths, Peter (2008) Is satisfaction a direct predictor of nursing turnover?: Modelling the relationship between satisfaction, expressed intention and behaviour in a longitudinal cohort study. Human Resources for Health, 6 (1), 22. (doi:10.1186/1478-4491-6-22). (PMID:18976478)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The theory of planned behaviour states that attitudinal variables (e.g. job satisfaction) only have an indirect effect on retention whereas intentions have a direct effect. This study uses secondary data from a longitudinal cohort of newly qualified nurses to test for the direct and indirect effects of job satisfaction (client care, staffing, development, relationships, education, work-life interface, resources, pay) and intentions to nurse on working as a nurse during the 3 years after qualification.

Method: A national sample (England) of newly qualified (1997/98) nurses (n = 3669) were surveyed at 6 months, 18 months and 3 years. ANOVA and MANOVA were used for comparison of mean job satisfaction scores between groups; intentions to nurse (very likely, likely vs. unlikely, very unlikely and unable to say at this stage); working (or not working as a nurse) at each time-point. Indirect and direct effects were tested using structural equation and logistic regression models.

Results: Intentions expressed at 6 months to nurse at 18 months were associated with higher scores on pay and relationships, and intentions at 3 years were associated with higher scores on care, development, relationships, work-life interface, resources, pay respectively. Intentions expressed at 18 months to nurse at 3 years were associated with higher scores on development, relationships, education and work-life interface. Associations with actual nursing were fewer. Those working as a nurse had higher satisfaction scores for development (18 months) and relationships (3 years). Regression models found significant associations between the pay and staffing factors and intentions expressed at 6 months to nurse at 18 months, and between pay and intentions to nurse at 3 years. Many of the associations between intentions and working as a nurse were significant. Development was the only job satisfaction factor significantly associated with working as a nurse and just at 18 months.

Conclusion: Results partially support the theory of planned behaviour. Intentions expressed by nurses are stronger predictors of working as a nurse than job satisfaction. Retention strategies should focus on identifying nurses showing early signs of departure with emphasis on developmental aspects, mentoring and support.



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Published date: 31 October 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 168217
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/168217
ISSN: 1478-4491
PURE UUID: 4d592788-ebb6-4dcc-afbe-e427fb8957c2
ORCID for Peter Griffiths: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2439-2857

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Date deposited: 25 Nov 2010 14:16
Last modified: 09 Dec 2019 20:25

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