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New generation of cladding pumped fibre lasers and amplifiers

New generation of cladding pumped fibre lasers and amplifiers
New generation of cladding pumped fibre lasers and amplifiers
In this talk we discuss recent developments in high power fibre lasers and amplifiers. Particular attention is paid to pump launching schemes and methods to minimise nonlinear distortion in fibre amplifiers.

Diode-pumped fibre lasers and amplifiers have firmly established themselves as a reliable source of multiWatt radiation in near IR region. Average power in excess of 100 W [1] and pulse energies above 2 mJ [2] are now available in fibre based laser sources.

High brightness high power pump is a key component in high power fibre-based devices. Currently available diode sources are powerful enough to pump a 100 W fibre laser even in traditional end-pumping scheme [1]. Further power scaling in this configuration becomes problematic due to significant difficulties in spatial separation of pump and signal beams.

There are several elegant solutions to this problem which include multimode pump couplers [3], the v-groove technique [4] and side pumping [5].

In this talk we will discuss advantages of a new technique based on single clad coiled fibres [6]. In this structure the pump waveguide of the active fibre is directly accessible from the side so that pump light travelling in separate pump fibers can directly couple over into the doped fibre. This technique is very flexible and offers multipoint pump injection. Also it equally applicable to medium (1-3 W) and high (>10 W) power fibre based devices. For high-energy devices (both amplifiers and Q-switched lasers) the challenge lies in founding core designs that can store a large amount of energy before self-saturation and spurious lasing between pulses limits further storage. The solution is to use a large core. This also increases threshold of unwanted nonlinear effects such as SBS and SRS. The downside is that beam quality degrades, as the core becomes multi-moded. We will discuss several solutions to this problem including application of complex refractive index profile [2] and tapered fibre filters [7].
Grudinin, A.B.
8f50b467-7d60-46db-b29d-a89b1059a1d8
Nilsson, J.
f41d0948-4ca9-4b93-b44d-680ca0bf157b
Turner, P.W.
b84fbbe4-2e35-4d0d-9b84-e654be63c4b9
Grudinin, A.B.
8f50b467-7d60-46db-b29d-a89b1059a1d8
Nilsson, J.
f41d0948-4ca9-4b93-b44d-680ca0bf157b
Turner, P.W.
b84fbbe4-2e35-4d0d-9b84-e654be63c4b9

Grudinin, A.B., Nilsson, J. and Turner, P.W. (2000) New generation of cladding pumped fibre lasers and amplifiers. CLEO 2000. 01 Sep 2000.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

In this talk we discuss recent developments in high power fibre lasers and amplifiers. Particular attention is paid to pump launching schemes and methods to minimise nonlinear distortion in fibre amplifiers.

Diode-pumped fibre lasers and amplifiers have firmly established themselves as a reliable source of multiWatt radiation in near IR region. Average power in excess of 100 W [1] and pulse energies above 2 mJ [2] are now available in fibre based laser sources.

High brightness high power pump is a key component in high power fibre-based devices. Currently available diode sources are powerful enough to pump a 100 W fibre laser even in traditional end-pumping scheme [1]. Further power scaling in this configuration becomes problematic due to significant difficulties in spatial separation of pump and signal beams.

There are several elegant solutions to this problem which include multimode pump couplers [3], the v-groove technique [4] and side pumping [5].

In this talk we will discuss advantages of a new technique based on single clad coiled fibres [6]. In this structure the pump waveguide of the active fibre is directly accessible from the side so that pump light travelling in separate pump fibers can directly couple over into the doped fibre. This technique is very flexible and offers multipoint pump injection. Also it equally applicable to medium (1-3 W) and high (>10 W) power fibre based devices. For high-energy devices (both amplifiers and Q-switched lasers) the challenge lies in founding core designs that can store a large amount of energy before self-saturation and spurious lasing between pulses limits further storage. The solution is to use a large core. This also increases threshold of unwanted nonlinear effects such as SBS and SRS. The downside is that beam quality degrades, as the core becomes multi-moded. We will discuss several solutions to this problem including application of complex refractive index profile [2] and tapered fibre filters [7].

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More information

Published date: 2000
Additional Information: CWA3 (Invited)
Venue - Dates: CLEO 2000, 2000-09-01 - 2000-09-01

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 16903
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/16903
PURE UUID: 553fced3-cce5-4ae0-b4f7-d46d89889bfd
ORCID for J. Nilsson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1691-7959

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Aug 2005
Last modified: 14 Dec 2018 01:36

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