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Biomechanical analysis of structural deformation in living cells

Biomechanical analysis of structural deformation in living cells
Biomechanical analysis of structural deformation in living cells
Most tissues are subject to some form of physiological mechanical loading which results in deformation of the cells triggering intracellular mechanotransduction pathways. This response to loading is generally essential for the health of the tissue, although more pronounced deformation may result in cell and tissue damage. In order to determine the biological response of cells to loading it is necessary to understand how cells and intracellular structures deform. This paper reviews the various loading systems that have been adopted for studying cell deformation both in situ within tissue explants and in isolated cell culture systems. In particular it describes loading systems which facilitate visualisation and subsequent quantification of cell deformation. The review also describes the associated microscopy and image analysis techniques. The review focuses on deformation of chondrocytes with additional information on a variety of other cell types including neurons, red blood cells, epithelial cells and skin and muscle cells
cell deformation, mechanotransduction, mechanics, confocal, biomechanics
0140-0118
951-963
Bader, D.L.
9884d4f6-2607-4d48-bf0c-62bdcc0d1dbf
Knight, M.
57a45154-c5e4-40ea-8187-031cc55f94cd
Bader, D.L.
9884d4f6-2607-4d48-bf0c-62bdcc0d1dbf
Knight, M.
57a45154-c5e4-40ea-8187-031cc55f94cd

Bader, D.L. and Knight, M. (2008) Biomechanical analysis of structural deformation in living cells. Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, 46 (10), 951-963. (doi:10.1007/s11517-008-0381-4). (PMID:18726630)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Most tissues are subject to some form of physiological mechanical loading which results in deformation of the cells triggering intracellular mechanotransduction pathways. This response to loading is generally essential for the health of the tissue, although more pronounced deformation may result in cell and tissue damage. In order to determine the biological response of cells to loading it is necessary to understand how cells and intracellular structures deform. This paper reviews the various loading systems that have been adopted for studying cell deformation both in situ within tissue explants and in isolated cell culture systems. In particular it describes loading systems which facilitate visualisation and subsequent quantification of cell deformation. The review also describes the associated microscopy and image analysis techniques. The review focuses on deformation of chondrocytes with additional information on a variety of other cell types including neurons, red blood cells, epithelial cells and skin and muscle cells

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More information

Published date: 26 August 2008
Keywords: cell deformation, mechanotransduction, mechanics, confocal, biomechanics
Organisations: Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 169053
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/169053
ISSN: 0140-0118
PURE UUID: 2bb2aeee-363e-4f24-a801-2d26d5bbd504
ORCID for D.L. Bader: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1208-3507

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Dec 2010 09:27
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:32

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