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Tropical ocean-atmosphere controls on inter-annual climate variability in the Cretaceous Arctic

Tropical ocean-atmosphere controls on inter-annual climate variability in the Cretaceous Arctic
Tropical ocean-atmosphere controls on inter-annual climate variability in the Cretaceous Arctic
The first annually resolved sedimentary record from the Cretaceous is used to develop time series of inter-annual and decadal scale climate variability from the Arctic Ocean. Analysis of records spanning 1000 years reveals strong periodicities in the quasi-biennial oscillation and El Niño – Southern Oscillation (ENSO) band as well as a 14 year period, which all closely match periodicities typical of modern high latitude climate variability. This supports the view that an Arctic Ocean free of permanent sea ice would be driven by similar forcing to the present state, implicating tropical ocean atmosphere interaction and demonstrating that stratosphere- troposphere coupling likely played a prominent role in the transmission of Cretaceous equatorial climate forcing to polar latitudes as has recently been established for the modern earth system. On the other hand, the prominent ENSO periodicities in our records argue against the hypothesized link between past warm climates and “permanent El Niño” states.
0094-8276
1-6
Davies, Andrew
dc4a10da-d700-4b73-aa81-2976d3b79576
Kemp, Alan E.S.
131b479e-c2c4-47ae-abe1-ad968490960e
Pälike, Heiko
b9bf7798-ad8c-479b-8487-dd9a30a61fa5
Davies, Andrew
dc4a10da-d700-4b73-aa81-2976d3b79576
Kemp, Alan E.S.
131b479e-c2c4-47ae-abe1-ad968490960e
Pälike, Heiko
b9bf7798-ad8c-479b-8487-dd9a30a61fa5

Davies, Andrew, Kemp, Alan E.S. and Pälike, Heiko (2011) Tropical ocean-atmosphere controls on inter-annual climate variability in the Cretaceous Arctic. Geophysical Research Letters, 38 (3), 1-6. (doi:10.1029/2010GL046151).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The first annually resolved sedimentary record from the Cretaceous is used to develop time series of inter-annual and decadal scale climate variability from the Arctic Ocean. Analysis of records spanning 1000 years reveals strong periodicities in the quasi-biennial oscillation and El Niño – Southern Oscillation (ENSO) band as well as a 14 year period, which all closely match periodicities typical of modern high latitude climate variability. This supports the view that an Arctic Ocean free of permanent sea ice would be driven by similar forcing to the present state, implicating tropical ocean atmosphere interaction and demonstrating that stratosphere- troposphere coupling likely played a prominent role in the transmission of Cretaceous equatorial climate forcing to polar latitudes as has recently been established for the modern earth system. On the other hand, the prominent ENSO periodicities in our records argue against the hypothesized link between past warm climates and “permanent El Niño” states.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 December 2010
Published date: 11 February 2011
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 170013
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/170013
ISSN: 0094-8276
PURE UUID: d374153d-ad18-4974-b6a9-aca3fa3ebf91

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Date deposited: 04 Jan 2011 14:52
Last modified: 20 Nov 2021 02:06

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Contributors

Author: Andrew Davies
Author: Alan E.S. Kemp
Author: Heiko Pälike

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