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Inhalation of 7.5% carbon dioxide increases threat processing in humans

Inhalation of 7.5% carbon dioxide increases threat processing in humans
Inhalation of 7.5% carbon dioxide increases threat processing in humans
Inhalation of 7.5% CO2 increases anxiety and autonomic arousal in humans, and elicits fear behavior in animals. However, it is not known whether CO2 challenge in humans induces dysfunction in neurocognitive processes that characterize generalized anxiety, notably selective attention to environmental threat. Healthy volunteers completed an emotional antisaccade task in which they looked toward or away from (inhibited) negative and neutral stimuli during inhalation of 7.5% CO2 and air. CO2 inhalation increased anxiety, autonomic arousal, and erroneous eye movements toward threat on antisaccade trials. Autonomic response to CO2 correlated with hypervigilance to threat (speed to initiate prosaccades) and reduced threat inhibition (increased orienting toward and slower orienting away from threat on antisaccade trials) independent of change in mood. Findings extend evidence that CO2 triggers fear behavior in animals via direct innervation of a distributed fear network that mobilizes the detection of and allocation of processing resources toward environmental threat in humans
1471-244X
1557-1662
Garner, M.
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072
Attwood, A.
32b03d9a-1026-4037-aef9-12fdbb2927be
Baldwin, D.S.
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
James, A.
99c482a7-ae49-4132-b2f4-69181d3d86b5
Munafo, M.
a815b5c6-5bd7-488e-a1bf-0068c932a844
Garner, M.
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072
Attwood, A.
32b03d9a-1026-4037-aef9-12fdbb2927be
Baldwin, D.S.
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
James, A.
99c482a7-ae49-4132-b2f4-69181d3d86b5
Munafo, M.
a815b5c6-5bd7-488e-a1bf-0068c932a844

Garner, M., Attwood, A., Baldwin, D.S., James, A. and Munafo, M. (2011) Inhalation of 7.5% carbon dioxide increases threat processing in humans. BMC Psychiatry, 36, 1557-1662. (doi:10.1038/npp.2011.15).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Inhalation of 7.5% CO2 increases anxiety and autonomic arousal in humans, and elicits fear behavior in animals. However, it is not known whether CO2 challenge in humans induces dysfunction in neurocognitive processes that characterize generalized anxiety, notably selective attention to environmental threat. Healthy volunteers completed an emotional antisaccade task in which they looked toward or away from (inhibited) negative and neutral stimuli during inhalation of 7.5% CO2 and air. CO2 inhalation increased anxiety, autonomic arousal, and erroneous eye movements toward threat on antisaccade trials. Autonomic response to CO2 correlated with hypervigilance to threat (speed to initiate prosaccades) and reduced threat inhibition (increased orienting toward and slower orienting away from threat on antisaccade trials) independent of change in mood. Findings extend evidence that CO2 triggers fear behavior in animals via direct innervation of a distributed fear network that mobilizes the detection of and allocation of processing resources toward environmental threat in humans

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More information

Published date: 13 April 2011
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Neurosciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 170135
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/170135
ISSN: 1471-244X
PURE UUID: 24f1bdef-8196-4cb0-b78c-f08659d0ad40
ORCID for D.S. Baldwin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3343-0907

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Date deposited: 04 Jan 2011 11:44
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:44

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