The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Novel photosensitive glasses

Novel photosensitive glasses
Novel photosensitive glasses
Optoelectronics and photonics are technologies of steadily growing importance, because they enable faster, more efficient ways of acquiring, storing, and transmitting information. Optoelectronics is the combination of electronic and optical effects in devices, whereas photonics deals with the development of all-optical components. Both technologies have already had an enormous impact in areas as diverse as telecommunications, manufacturing, retailing, medicine and entertainment. Despite this rapid progress, optoelectronics and photonics have their future ahead of them. The increasing importance of information in our society requires their development, enhancing the progress of the European telecommunication industry.

Fundamental devices in the field of optoelectronics and photonics are glass fibers and waveguides with diverse functions and properties. In the last decade, photosensitivity of glass fibers and waveguides has received much attraction. A high photosensitivity enables the imprinting of special structures into glasses by lasers as a result of refractive index changes. This phenomenon is used to write directly Bragg gratings and waveguides into glasses, which has an enormous impact on the manufacturing, tailoring and efficiency of optical devices.
Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.
e3e2475c-2377-47ff-a544-f723c2e61aca
Riziotis, C.
a2037f27-c711-46c3-bec4-2293fca6f0e0
Taylor, E.R.
d9a73a87-6abd-4a1e-a462-84549c667d19
Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.
e3e2475c-2377-47ff-a544-f723c2e61aca
Riziotis, C.
a2037f27-c711-46c3-bec4-2293fca6f0e0
Taylor, E.R.
d9a73a87-6abd-4a1e-a462-84549c667d19

Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H., Riziotis, C. and Taylor, E.R. (2001) Novel photosensitive glasses. 10th Workshop of Marie Curie Fellows. 06 - 07 Sep 2001.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Optoelectronics and photonics are technologies of steadily growing importance, because they enable faster, more efficient ways of acquiring, storing, and transmitting information. Optoelectronics is the combination of electronic and optical effects in devices, whereas photonics deals with the development of all-optical components. Both technologies have already had an enormous impact in areas as diverse as telecommunications, manufacturing, retailing, medicine and entertainment. Despite this rapid progress, optoelectronics and photonics have their future ahead of them. The increasing importance of information in our society requires their development, enhancing the progress of the European telecommunication industry.

Fundamental devices in the field of optoelectronics and photonics are glass fibers and waveguides with diverse functions and properties. In the last decade, photosensitivity of glass fibers and waveguides has received much attraction. A high photosensitivity enables the imprinting of special structures into glasses by lasers as a result of refractive index changes. This phenomenon is used to write directly Bragg gratings and waveguides into glasses, which has an enormous impact on the manufacturing, tailoring and efficiency of optical devices.

PDF
2360.pdf - Other
Download (260kB)

More information

Published date: 2001
Venue - Dates: 10th Workshop of Marie Curie Fellows, 2001-09-06 - 2001-09-07

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 17108
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/17108
PURE UUID: 5b971571-4771-49d8-8caf-fe5de71ab319

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Sep 2005
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:40

Export record

Contributors

Author: H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem
Author: C. Riziotis
Author: E.R. Taylor

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×