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Microstructured fibres: moulding the properties of light

Microstructured fibres: moulding the properties of light
Microstructured fibres: moulding the properties of light
The combination of wavelength-scale features and geometric flexibility offered by microstructured or holey optical fibres (HFs) leads to a significantly broader range of optical properties than is possible in conventional optical fibres (see the examples in Figure 1). These properties include single-mode guidance at all wavelengths, novel dispersion properties including broadband dispersion flattening and anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths, mode size tailoring over three orders of magnitude, and many more. The optical properties of holey fibres are determined by the size, shape and locations of the air holes that define the cladding region. HFs can be made either from a single material (eg pure silica) or can be doped, which allows active fibre devices to be made.

Progress in this rapidly emerging technology will be reviewed, ranging from modelling and fabrication through to applications and practical devices.
Monro, T.M.
4f0295a8-d9ec-45a5-b72b-72908f2549bb
Monro, T.M.
4f0295a8-d9ec-45a5-b72b-72908f2549bb

Monro, T.M. (2001) Microstructured fibres: moulding the properties of light. International Workshop on Nonlinear Photonic Crystals - Danish Technical University, Lyngby, Denmark. 24 - 25 Oct 2001.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

The combination of wavelength-scale features and geometric flexibility offered by microstructured or holey optical fibres (HFs) leads to a significantly broader range of optical properties than is possible in conventional optical fibres (see the examples in Figure 1). These properties include single-mode guidance at all wavelengths, novel dispersion properties including broadband dispersion flattening and anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths, mode size tailoring over three orders of magnitude, and many more. The optical properties of holey fibres are determined by the size, shape and locations of the air holes that define the cladding region. HFs can be made either from a single material (eg pure silica) or can be doped, which allows active fibre devices to be made.

Progress in this rapidly emerging technology will be reviewed, ranging from modelling and fabrication through to applications and practical devices.

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Published date: 2001
Venue - Dates: International Workshop on Nonlinear Photonic Crystals - Danish Technical University, Lyngby, Denmark, 2001-10-24 - 2001-10-25

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 17119
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/17119
PURE UUID: f7eb7303-35b7-490d-8b4e-48a9473e9a8f

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Date deposited: 16 Sep 2005
Last modified: 11 Dec 2021 14:11

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Contributors

Author: T.M. Monro

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