The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Broadband Fibre Devices

Broadband Fibre Devices
Broadband Fibre Devices
Fibre devices technology has reached a mature status over the last few years. It has been an important part of our experimental research at the ORC. Some interesting results have been obtained by various companies, which demonstrates their already commercial availability. For instance, 110 Watts from a CW fibre laser was reported by SDL in the USA From a pulsed fibre laser, ~1kW of output power has been obtained by IPG. On the other hand, 2.3mJ and 7.7 mJ in Q-switched regime have been demonstrated at the ORC.

Among the main characteristics of fibre lasers we can mention its broadband, wide tunability, narrow linewidth and single polarisation. From their applications one can include: telecommunications (high power EDFA, Raman lasers and amplifiers), medical applications, remote sensing, and material processing. For these capabilities and applications fibre lasers are considered a viable alternative to high power bulk lasers, i.e. Nd:YAG replacement.

In this paper, we will describe a cladding pumping scheme that is employed to increase launched pump power into double clad rare-earth doped fibres. Different pumping schemes have been proposed and will also be reviewed. With this technique maximum launching efficiencies can reach up to 80%.

In our studies, Yb3+, Nd3+, Er3+/Yb3+ and Th3+-doped fibre lasers were developed with fibres made in-house. Initially a maximum 22-W of CW output power and a slope efficiency of 83% from a Yb3+-doped fibre was demonstrated. A 70-nm tuning range was achieved using an external bulk grating device. For Nd3+ fibre lasers, an 80nm tuning range was demonstrated. In a co-doping scheme, an Er3+/Yb3+-doped fibre laser was investigated. It provided 16.8W of output power (CW) at 1050nm and was tuned from 1530 to 1602 nm. The average output power was >5 W and showed a 0.2 linewidth over the entire range. Thulium-doped fibre lasers reached over 300nm tuning range from two different fibres. Experimental set-ups, fibre characteristics and mentioned results will be briefly explained.

Finally, a review of GTWaveTM fibre technology as a novel pumping scheme, a reconfigurable, multiport 32-dB amplifier and superior fibre Bragg gratings technology will also be discussed in this paper.
Alvarez-Chavez, J.A.
fbbf6f21-0e7a-456c-b675-540b4f0501d1
Nilsson, J.
f41d0948-4ca9-4b93-b44d-680ca0bf157b
Clarkson, W.A.
3b060f63-a303-4fa5-ad50-95f166df1ba2
Grudinin, A.B.
8f50b467-7d60-46db-b29d-a89b1059a1d8
Alvarez-Chavez, J.A.
fbbf6f21-0e7a-456c-b675-540b4f0501d1
Nilsson, J.
f41d0948-4ca9-4b93-b44d-680ca0bf157b
Clarkson, W.A.
3b060f63-a303-4fa5-ad50-95f166df1ba2
Grudinin, A.B.
8f50b467-7d60-46db-b29d-a89b1059a1d8

Alvarez-Chavez, J.A., Nilsson, J., Clarkson, W.A. and Grudinin, A.B. (2001) Broadband Fibre Devices. Rank Prize Symposium, United Kingdom. 18 - 21 Jun 2001.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Fibre devices technology has reached a mature status over the last few years. It has been an important part of our experimental research at the ORC. Some interesting results have been obtained by various companies, which demonstrates their already commercial availability. For instance, 110 Watts from a CW fibre laser was reported by SDL in the USA From a pulsed fibre laser, ~1kW of output power has been obtained by IPG. On the other hand, 2.3mJ and 7.7 mJ in Q-switched regime have been demonstrated at the ORC.

Among the main characteristics of fibre lasers we can mention its broadband, wide tunability, narrow linewidth and single polarisation. From their applications one can include: telecommunications (high power EDFA, Raman lasers and amplifiers), medical applications, remote sensing, and material processing. For these capabilities and applications fibre lasers are considered a viable alternative to high power bulk lasers, i.e. Nd:YAG replacement.

In this paper, we will describe a cladding pumping scheme that is employed to increase launched pump power into double clad rare-earth doped fibres. Different pumping schemes have been proposed and will also be reviewed. With this technique maximum launching efficiencies can reach up to 80%.

In our studies, Yb3+, Nd3+, Er3+/Yb3+ and Th3+-doped fibre lasers were developed with fibres made in-house. Initially a maximum 22-W of CW output power and a slope efficiency of 83% from a Yb3+-doped fibre was demonstrated. A 70-nm tuning range was achieved using an external bulk grating device. For Nd3+ fibre lasers, an 80nm tuning range was demonstrated. In a co-doping scheme, an Er3+/Yb3+-doped fibre laser was investigated. It provided 16.8W of output power (CW) at 1050nm and was tuned from 1530 to 1602 nm. The average output power was >5 W and showed a 0.2 linewidth over the entire range. Thulium-doped fibre lasers reached over 300nm tuning range from two different fibres. Experimental set-ups, fibre characteristics and mentioned results will be briefly explained.

Finally, a review of GTWaveTM fibre technology as a novel pumping scheme, a reconfigurable, multiport 32-dB amplifier and superior fibre Bragg gratings technology will also be discussed in this paper.

PDF
2246.pdf - Other
Download (81kB)

More information

Published date: 2001
Venue - Dates: Rank Prize Symposium, United Kingdom, 2001-06-18 - 2001-06-21

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 17138
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/17138
PURE UUID: a574f032-284b-41ac-877d-feb41655cb7a
ORCID for J. Nilsson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1691-7959

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Sep 2005
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:55

Export record

Contributors

Author: J.A. Alvarez-Chavez
Author: J. Nilsson ORCID iD
Author: W.A. Clarkson
Author: A.B. Grudinin

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×