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Biominerals and the vertical flux of particulate organic carbon from the surface ocean

Biominerals and the vertical flux of particulate organic carbon from the surface ocean
Biominerals and the vertical flux of particulate organic carbon from the surface ocean
Particulate inorganic carbon (PIC; calcium carbonate) is thought to be a significant source of light scattering in the sea. It also provides ballast for particulate matter, driving the ocean's biological carbon pump. During three trans?Atlantic cruises, we measured particle optical properties plus concentrations of the three major components of sinking aggregates [particulate organic carbon (POC), PIC and biogenic silica (BSi)]. PIC contributed 15–23% of particle backscattering in oligotrophic subtropical gyres and temperate waters. Light scattering properties allowed quantification of the surface PIC:POC ratio. The ratio of the two ballast minerals (PIC:BSi) was significantly, inversely, correlated to POC concentration, allowing robust modeling of the density of sinking aggregates. Results showed greater PIC:POC ratios and sinking rates in oligotrophic regions due to greater relative abundance of PIC.
0094-8276
L22605
Balch, W.M.
9f519f3f-949a-481b-83ed-6d856745c9c9
Bowler, B.C.
119e1a74-d79a-4bc9-9cf8-b3011c956f51
Drapeau, D.T.
b8e48aca-10a2-4f94-b9d1-c88c8ae794cb
Poulton, A.J.
14bf64a7-d617-4913-b882-e8495543e717
Holligan, P.M.
4c1d9d64-dfa7-49bf-9e15-37f891d59b7c
Balch, W.M.
9f519f3f-949a-481b-83ed-6d856745c9c9
Bowler, B.C.
119e1a74-d79a-4bc9-9cf8-b3011c956f51
Drapeau, D.T.
b8e48aca-10a2-4f94-b9d1-c88c8ae794cb
Poulton, A.J.
14bf64a7-d617-4913-b882-e8495543e717
Holligan, P.M.
4c1d9d64-dfa7-49bf-9e15-37f891d59b7c

Balch, W.M., Bowler, B.C., Drapeau, D.T., Poulton, A.J. and Holligan, P.M. (2010) Biominerals and the vertical flux of particulate organic carbon from the surface ocean. Geophysical Research Letters, 37 (22), L22605.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Particulate inorganic carbon (PIC; calcium carbonate) is thought to be a significant source of light scattering in the sea. It also provides ballast for particulate matter, driving the ocean's biological carbon pump. During three trans?Atlantic cruises, we measured particle optical properties plus concentrations of the three major components of sinking aggregates [particulate organic carbon (POC), PIC and biogenic silica (BSi)]. PIC contributed 15–23% of particle backscattering in oligotrophic subtropical gyres and temperate waters. Light scattering properties allowed quantification of the surface PIC:POC ratio. The ratio of the two ballast minerals (PIC:BSi) was significantly, inversely, correlated to POC concentration, allowing robust modeling of the density of sinking aggregates. Results showed greater PIC:POC ratios and sinking rates in oligotrophic regions due to greater relative abundance of PIC.

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More information

Published date: 28 November 2010
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Marine Biogeochemistry, National Oceanography Centre,Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 171661
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/171661
ISSN: 0094-8276
PURE UUID: 0edfe413-7f3d-487a-8aff-64cceb8ad5c9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Jan 2011 15:08
Last modified: 26 Oct 2017 13:47

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