The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A national survey of health professionals working in voluntary hospice services in the UK. I. Attitudes to current issues affecting hospices and palliative care.

A national survey of health professionals working in voluntary hospice services in the UK. I. Attitudes to current issues affecting hospices and palliative care.
A national survey of health professionals working in voluntary hospice services in the UK. I. Attitudes to current issues affecting hospices and palliative care.
This paper reports results from a national survey in 1999 of voluntary hospice services in the UK. It focuses on volunteer and staff views of the purposes of hospice care, and on current debates within palliative care. Twenty-five hospice services, stratified by region, services provided (inpatient care, day care and/or home care) and number of beds were randomly sampled from amongst 175 voluntary hospices in the UK. Nineteen participated. Seventy per cent of a random sample of professional and voluntary staff within these hospices returned a postal questionnaire. Both volunteers and professionals considered care of the whole person, pain and symptom control, quality of life and dying peacefully to be important aspects of hospice care. Most doctors chose care of the whole person as the most important aspect, and they were more likely to choose this option than other staff. Hospice volunteers were less positive than hospice staff (particularly doctors and nurses) in their attitudes to extending hospice care to noncancer patients (where many volunteers held no strong view), to restricting care to patients with specialist palliative care needs, and less negative about euthanasia. These findings illustrate the importance of including hospice volunteers and the general public, as well as hospice staff, in debates about the future of hospice and palliative care in the UK. Further research is needed into lay and professional views of the role of hospices and palliative care services.
attitudes, hospices, noncancer, volunteers
0269-2163
40-48
Addington-Hall, J.M.
87560cc4-7562-4f9b-b908-81f3b603fdd8
Karlsen, S.
d27830c2-b6d9-475e-8e91-b2c98b5eb91a
Addington-Hall, J.M.
87560cc4-7562-4f9b-b908-81f3b603fdd8
Karlsen, S.
d27830c2-b6d9-475e-8e91-b2c98b5eb91a

Addington-Hall, J.M. and Karlsen, S. (2005) A national survey of health professionals working in voluntary hospice services in the UK. I. Attitudes to current issues affecting hospices and palliative care. Palliative Medicine, 19 (1), 40-48.

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper reports results from a national survey in 1999 of voluntary hospice services in the UK. It focuses on volunteer and staff views of the purposes of hospice care, and on current debates within palliative care. Twenty-five hospice services, stratified by region, services provided (inpatient care, day care and/or home care) and number of beds were randomly sampled from amongst 175 voluntary hospices in the UK. Nineteen participated. Seventy per cent of a random sample of professional and voluntary staff within these hospices returned a postal questionnaire. Both volunteers and professionals considered care of the whole person, pain and symptom control, quality of life and dying peacefully to be important aspects of hospice care. Most doctors chose care of the whole person as the most important aspect, and they were more likely to choose this option than other staff. Hospice volunteers were less positive than hospice staff (particularly doctors and nurses) in their attitudes to extending hospice care to noncancer patients (where many volunteers held no strong view), to restricting care to patients with specialist palliative care needs, and less negative about euthanasia. These findings illustrate the importance of including hospice volunteers and the general public, as well as hospice staff, in debates about the future of hospice and palliative care in the UK. Further research is needed into lay and professional views of the role of hospices and palliative care services.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2005
Keywords: attitudes, hospices, noncancer, volunteers

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 17312
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/17312
ISSN: 0269-2163
PURE UUID: 518ffb3b-30ee-483c-ab8d-efc19d807de1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Aug 2005
Last modified: 11 Nov 2017 14:12

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×