Methodological change in school effectieveness and improvement research


Muijs, R.D. (2011) Methodological change in school effectieveness and improvement research At International Congress for School Effectiveness and School Improvement. 04 - 07 Jan 2011.

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Description/Abstract

School Effectiveness and School Improvement have played an important part in developing and refining methods in educational research. However, we would hypothesize that this development has also led to a certain crystallization of these methods, to the extent that it is now possible to talk of a methodological orthodoxy in both effectiveness and improvement research. To test this hypothesis, we looked at articles published in 'School Effectiveness and School Improvement' between issue 1 of 2005 and issue 2 of 2010. Results show that both quantitative and qualitative studies are dominated by a limited range of data collection methods. Over 80% of qualitative studies reported on are case studies, with the remainder being other interview methods. Of quantitative studies, almost 60% are survey studies, and just under 23% use secondary data, such as international studies and national or local accountability data sets. Almost 16% of studies used quasi-experimental designs. In terms of data analysis, in quantitative studies almost 50% of papers use multilevel methods, while a further 35% use 'traditional' statistics, such as regression and parametric or non-parametric tests. In qualitative methods the vast majority of studies used some form of thematic analysis. Implications of these fidnings and recommendations for future research are provided

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Venue - Dates: International Congress for School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 2011-01-04 - 2011-01-07
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ePrint ID: 173601
Date :
Date Event
5 January 2011Published
Date Deposited: 04 Feb 2011 15:18
Last Modified: 18 Apr 2017 03:21
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/173601

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