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Anthropogenic modification of the oceans

Anthropogenic modification of the oceans
Anthropogenic modification of the oceans
Human activities are altering the ocean in many different ways. The surface ocean is warming and, as a result, it is becoming more stratified and sea level is rising. There is no clear evidence yet of a slowing in ocean circulation, although this is predicted for the future. As anthropogenic CO2 permeates into the ocean, it is making sea water more acidic, to the detriment of surface corals and probably many other calcifiers. Once acidification reaches the deep ocean, it will become more corrosive to CaCO3, leading to a considerable reduction in the amount of CaCO3 accumulating on the deep seafloor. There will be a several thousand-year-long interruption to CaCO3 sedimentation at many points on the seafloor. A curious feedback in the ocean, carbonate compensation, makes it more likely that global warming and sea-level rise will continue for many millennia after CO2 emissions cease.
1364-503X
887-908
Tyrrell, T.
6808411d-c9cf-47a3-88b6-c7c294f2d114
Tyrrell, T.
6808411d-c9cf-47a3-88b6-c7c294f2d114

Tyrrell, T. (2011) Anthropogenic modification of the oceans. Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 369 (1938), 887-908. (doi:10.1098/rsta.2010.0334).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Human activities are altering the ocean in many different ways. The surface ocean is warming and, as a result, it is becoming more stratified and sea level is rising. There is no clear evidence yet of a slowing in ocean circulation, although this is predicted for the future. As anthropogenic CO2 permeates into the ocean, it is making sea water more acidic, to the detriment of surface corals and probably many other calcifiers. Once acidification reaches the deep ocean, it will become more corrosive to CaCO3, leading to a considerable reduction in the amount of CaCO3 accumulating on the deep seafloor. There will be a several thousand-year-long interruption to CaCO3 sedimentation at many points on the seafloor. A curious feedback in the ocean, carbonate compensation, makes it more likely that global warming and sea-level rise will continue for many millennia after CO2 emissions cease.

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More information

Published date: 2011

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 173915
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/173915
ISSN: 1364-503X
PURE UUID: b16d62ab-4474-4a36-aa7f-e6fa8be49e58
ORCID for T. Tyrrell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1002-1716

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Feb 2011 17:00
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:59

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