The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Best practices in research methods: palliative care research in practice

Best practices in research methods: palliative care research in practice
Best practices in research methods: palliative care research in practice
From an initial focus on the care of people in the last weeks or days of life, the principles and practice of palliative care have been increasingly recognized as beneficial for people earlier in their disease trajectory, from the point of diagnosis (Ahmedzai & Walsh, 2000; World Health Organization, 2005). Yet the reality is that the majority of patients receiving care from hospice and specialist palliative services are in the last months, weeks, or days of life (Eve, Smith, & Tebbit, 1997; Lamont & Christakis, 2002). In addition, although the relevance of palliative care to people who die from conditions other than cancer is increasingly recognized (Addington-Hall & Higginson, 2001), the majority of patients currently receiving care in most settings have cancer, with most of the remainder having AIDS or neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease. This article focuses on the challenges of working as a researcher with people with advanced, progressive disease who are coming to the end of their lives. Our empathy with and compassion for our fellow human beings facing the end of their lives can cause us to find the idea of palliative care research rather unsettling, and to even question whether it is an appropriate pursuit. To address this satisfactorily we need, I think, a clear sense of the potential benefits of research in this area, the risks of not doing such research, and the ethical dimensions of such research.
palliative care, hospice, researcher, challenges, best practice, research methods
0844-5621
85-93
Addington-Hall, J.
87560cc4-7562-4f9b-b908-81f3b603fdd8
Addington-Hall, J.
87560cc4-7562-4f9b-b908-81f3b603fdd8

Addington-Hall, J. (2005) Best practices in research methods: palliative care research in practice. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 37 (2), 85-93.

Record type: Article

Abstract

From an initial focus on the care of people in the last weeks or days of life, the principles and practice of palliative care have been increasingly recognized as beneficial for people earlier in their disease trajectory, from the point of diagnosis (Ahmedzai & Walsh, 2000; World Health Organization, 2005). Yet the reality is that the majority of patients receiving care from hospice and specialist palliative services are in the last months, weeks, or days of life (Eve, Smith, & Tebbit, 1997; Lamont & Christakis, 2002). In addition, although the relevance of palliative care to people who die from conditions other than cancer is increasingly recognized (Addington-Hall & Higginson, 2001), the majority of patients currently receiving care in most settings have cancer, with most of the remainder having AIDS or neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease. This article focuses on the challenges of working as a researcher with people with advanced, progressive disease who are coming to the end of their lives. Our empathy with and compassion for our fellow human beings facing the end of their lives can cause us to find the idea of palliative care research rather unsettling, and to even question whether it is an appropriate pursuit. To address this satisfactorily we need, I think, a clear sense of the potential benefits of research in this area, the risks of not doing such research, and the ethical dimensions of such research.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: June 2005
Keywords: palliative care, hospice, researcher, challenges, best practice, research methods

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 17579
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/17579
ISSN: 0844-5621
PURE UUID: ac10cf94-7d45-4a81-8201-ecf0a079fd65

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Oct 2005
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:38

Export record

Contributors

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×