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Grey waters bright with Neolithic argonauts? Maritime connections and the Mesolithic–Neolithic transition within the ‘western seaways’ of Britain, c. 5000–3500 BC

Record type: Article

Careful examination of the probable natural conditions for travel in the North Sea and Irish Sea during the late Mesolithic are here combined with the latest radiocarbon dates to present a new picture of the transition to the Neolithic in the British Isles. The islands of the west were already connected by Mesolithic traffic and did not all go Neolithic at the same time. The introduction of the Neolithic package neither depended on seaborne incomers nor on proximity to the continent. More interesting forces were probably operating on an already busy seaway

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Citation

Garrow, Duncan and Sturt, Fraser (2011) Grey waters bright with Neolithic argonauts? Maritime connections and the Mesolithic–Neolithic transition within the ‘western seaways’ of Britain, c. 5000–3500 BC Antiquity, 85, (327), pp. 59-72.

More information

Published date: 2011
Keywords: britain, ireland, irish sea, north sea, mesolithic, neolithic
Organisations: Archaeology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 175907
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/175907
ISSN: 0003-598X
PURE UUID: e869f6ca-9cbc-4ac9-9be0-ee8036532adf

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Mar 2011 08:47
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:09

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Contributors

Author: Duncan Garrow
Author: Fraser Sturt

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