The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

There is a slight increase in incident diabetes risk with the use of statins, but benefits likely outweigh any adverse effects in those with moderate-to-high cardiovascular risk

There is a slight increase in incident diabetes risk with the use of statins, but benefits likely outweigh any adverse effects in those with moderate-to-high cardiovascular risk
There is a slight increase in incident diabetes risk with the use of statins, but benefits likely outweigh any adverse effects in those with moderate-to-high cardiovascular risk
Statins are one of the most widely used drug classes, with approximately 50 million prescriptions dispensed in England alone in 2008. Their efficacy and safety in significantly reducing cardiovascular events in moderate-to-high-risk patients has been well documented, both in primary and secondary prevention. 1 Commonly reported side-effects include muscle aches and increases in liver enzymes, but, in general, statins are well tolerated with a low incidence of side-effects. However, the recent collaborative meta-analysis of 13 major placebo-controlled statin trials by Sattar and colleagues reports a 9% increased risk for incident diabetes over 4 years (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.02-1-17) in patients randomised to statins compared to those assigned to placebo. Heterogeneity between trials was low (I 2=11%), suggesting that this risk appears to be a true class effect, despite known differences in lipophilicity and metabolic clearance pathways between individual statin drugs
1356-5524
84-85
Bhatia, Lokpal
4cb41d34-0a6b-47fe-94c9-b40e1fbc3e09
Byrne, Christopher D.
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Bhatia, Lokpal
4cb41d34-0a6b-47fe-94c9-b40e1fbc3e09
Byrne, Christopher D.
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c

Bhatia, Lokpal and Byrne, Christopher D. (2010) There is a slight increase in incident diabetes risk with the use of statins, but benefits likely outweigh any adverse effects in those with moderate-to-high cardiovascular risk. Evidence-Based Medicine, 15 (3), 84-85. (doi:10.1136/ebm1075). (PMID:20522688)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Statins are one of the most widely used drug classes, with approximately 50 million prescriptions dispensed in England alone in 2008. Their efficacy and safety in significantly reducing cardiovascular events in moderate-to-high-risk patients has been well documented, both in primary and secondary prevention. 1 Commonly reported side-effects include muscle aches and increases in liver enzymes, but, in general, statins are well tolerated with a low incidence of side-effects. However, the recent collaborative meta-analysis of 13 major placebo-controlled statin trials by Sattar and colleagues reports a 9% increased risk for incident diabetes over 4 years (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.02-1-17) in patients randomised to statins compared to those assigned to placebo. Heterogeneity between trials was low (I 2=11%), suggesting that this risk appears to be a true class effect, despite known differences in lipophilicity and metabolic clearance pathways between individual statin drugs

Text
84.full.pdf - Version of Record
Download (73kB)

More information

Published date: June 2010

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 176479
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/176479
ISSN: 1356-5524
PURE UUID: 987d67fb-f4b0-4319-940c-cbbc23a2919b
ORCID for Christopher D. Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6322-7753

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Mar 2011 09:47
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:49

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Lokpal Bhatia

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×