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Effect of faradic products on direct current-stimulated calvarial organ culture calcium levels

Effect of faradic products on direct current-stimulated calvarial organ culture calcium levels
Effect of faradic products on direct current-stimulated calvarial organ culture calcium levels
Calcium release from mouse calvarial organ cultures was used to analyse the well-described biological effects of constant direct current (20 ?A) in combination with Faradic products generated at a titanium wire cathode. Constant 20-?A direct current stimulation alone, delivered by agar salt bridges, consistently lowered the media calcium levels. Direct exposure of calvariae to a titanium cathode and its faradic products resulted in further lowering of media calcium levels and also a significant increase in the media pH. Hydrogen peroxide is a faradic product of the titanium cathode, micromolar amounts being generated by our system over 24 hr. H2O2 is pro-resorptive whereas elevated pH stimulates osteoblast activity. We propose that where bone tissue is in direct contact with metal wire cathodes, the faradic products, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl ion, are significant factors which, in their own right, further contribute to accelerated remodelling and improved clinical outcome.
0006-291X
657-661
Bodamyali, T.
1ac1f466-58d4-4ac8-8cac-264b6dd1f384
Kanczler, J.M.
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Simon, B.
1a713722-984e-45dc-8b04-9044b28f127b
Blake, D.R.
6e4cc35d-a9b8-459e-bd39-f36501dd735c
Stevens, C.R.
70732c45-74f8-4f00-9f5b-f729b7896060
Bodamyali, T.
1ac1f466-58d4-4ac8-8cac-264b6dd1f384
Kanczler, J.M.
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Simon, B.
1a713722-984e-45dc-8b04-9044b28f127b
Blake, D.R.
6e4cc35d-a9b8-459e-bd39-f36501dd735c
Stevens, C.R.
70732c45-74f8-4f00-9f5b-f729b7896060

Bodamyali, T., Kanczler, J.M., Simon, B., Blake, D.R. and Stevens, C.R. (1998) Effect of faradic products on direct current-stimulated calvarial organ culture calcium levels. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 264 (3), 657-661. (doi:10.1006/bbrc.1999.1355). (PMID:10543988)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Calcium release from mouse calvarial organ cultures was used to analyse the well-described biological effects of constant direct current (20 ?A) in combination with Faradic products generated at a titanium wire cathode. Constant 20-?A direct current stimulation alone, delivered by agar salt bridges, consistently lowered the media calcium levels. Direct exposure of calvariae to a titanium cathode and its faradic products resulted in further lowering of media calcium levels and also a significant increase in the media pH. Hydrogen peroxide is a faradic product of the titanium cathode, micromolar amounts being generated by our system over 24 hr. H2O2 is pro-resorptive whereas elevated pH stimulates osteoblast activity. We propose that where bone tissue is in direct contact with metal wire cathodes, the faradic products, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl ion, are significant factors which, in their own right, further contribute to accelerated remodelling and improved clinical outcome.

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Published date: September 1998

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 176589
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/176589
ISSN: 0006-291X
PURE UUID: 3e0924e7-10de-408b-bbc3-0c5081c483db
ORCID for J.M. Kanczler: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7249-0414

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Date deposited: 10 Mar 2011 10:07
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:42

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