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Attention-induced deactivations in very low frequency EEG oscillations: differential localisation according to ADHD symptom status

Attention-induced deactivations in very low frequency EEG oscillations: differential localisation according to ADHD symptom status
Attention-induced deactivations in very low frequency EEG oscillations: differential localisation according to ADHD symptom status
Background: the default-mode network (DMN) is characterised by coherent very low frequency (VLF) brain oscillations. The cognitive significance of this VLF profile remains unclear, partly because of the temporally constrained nature of the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal. Previously we have identified a VLF EEG network of scalp locations that shares many features of the DMN. Here we explore the intracranial sources of VLF EEG and examine their overlap with the DMN in adults with high and low ADHD ratings.

Methodology/Principal Findings: DC-EEG was recorded using an equidistant 66 channel electrode montage in 25 adult participants with high- and 25 participants with low-ratings of ADHD symptoms during a rest condition and an attention demanding Eriksen task. VLF EEG power was calculated in the VLF band (0.02 to 0.2 Hz) for the rest and task condition and compared for high and low ADHD participants. sLORETA was used to identify brain sources associated with the attention-induced deactivation of VLF EEG power, and to examine these sources in relation to ADHD symptoms. There was significant deactivation of VLF EEG power between the rest and task condition for the whole sample. Using s-LORETA the sources of this deactivation were localised to medial prefrontal regions, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and temporal regions. However, deactivation sources were different for high and low ADHD groups: In the low ADHD group attention-induced VLF EEG deactivation was most significant in medial prefrontal regions while for the high ADHD group this deactivation was predominantly localised to the temporal lobes.

Conclusions/Significance: attention-induced VLF EEG deactivations have intracranial sources that appear to overlap with those of the DMN. Furthermore, these seem to be related to ADHD symptom status, with high ADHD adults failing to significantly deactivate medial prefrontal regions while at the same time showing significant attenuation of VLF EEG power in temporal lobes
1932-6203
e17325
Broyd, Samantha J.
3ff5fb0f-f452-4e84-a260-8e5853f701a3
Helps, Suzannah K.
a80e9c33-f85b-4ecf-b956-9312a6f61fae
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635
Broyd, Samantha J.
3ff5fb0f-f452-4e84-a260-8e5853f701a3
Helps, Suzannah K.
a80e9c33-f85b-4ecf-b956-9312a6f61fae
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635

Broyd, Samantha J., Helps, Suzannah K. and Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S. (2011) Attention-induced deactivations in very low frequency EEG oscillations: differential localisation according to ADHD symptom status. PLoS ONE, 6 (3), e17325. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0017325).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: the default-mode network (DMN) is characterised by coherent very low frequency (VLF) brain oscillations. The cognitive significance of this VLF profile remains unclear, partly because of the temporally constrained nature of the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal. Previously we have identified a VLF EEG network of scalp locations that shares many features of the DMN. Here we explore the intracranial sources of VLF EEG and examine their overlap with the DMN in adults with high and low ADHD ratings.

Methodology/Principal Findings: DC-EEG was recorded using an equidistant 66 channel electrode montage in 25 adult participants with high- and 25 participants with low-ratings of ADHD symptoms during a rest condition and an attention demanding Eriksen task. VLF EEG power was calculated in the VLF band (0.02 to 0.2 Hz) for the rest and task condition and compared for high and low ADHD participants. sLORETA was used to identify brain sources associated with the attention-induced deactivation of VLF EEG power, and to examine these sources in relation to ADHD symptoms. There was significant deactivation of VLF EEG power between the rest and task condition for the whole sample. Using s-LORETA the sources of this deactivation were localised to medial prefrontal regions, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and temporal regions. However, deactivation sources were different for high and low ADHD groups: In the low ADHD group attention-induced VLF EEG deactivation was most significant in medial prefrontal regions while for the high ADHD group this deactivation was predominantly localised to the temporal lobes.

Conclusions/Significance: attention-induced VLF EEG deactivations have intracranial sources that appear to overlap with those of the DMN. Furthermore, these seem to be related to ADHD symptom status, with high ADHD adults failing to significantly deactivate medial prefrontal regions while at the same time showing significant attenuation of VLF EEG power in temporal lobes

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Published date: March 2011

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 176723
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/176723
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: d057f5f9-b004-4967-97c8-803d146ccf60

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Date deposited: 10 Mar 2011 12:48
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:07

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Author: Samantha J. Broyd
Author: Suzannah K. Helps
Author: Edmund J. S. Sonuga-Barke

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