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A pilot study measuring mixed venous carbon dioxide levels in students with and without a diagnosis of asthma

A pilot study measuring mixed venous carbon dioxide levels in students with and without a diagnosis of asthma
A pilot study measuring mixed venous carbon dioxide levels in students with and without a diagnosis of asthma
Objectives To pilot a protocol for measuring mixed venous carbon dioxide levels in individuals with asthma and establish likely values and variance for future power calculations.
Design Preliminary pilot study comparing two groups of individuals defined as asthmatic and non-asthmatic.
Setting Lung function laboratory in a regional teaching hospital.
Participants Eleven university students, five with a diagnosis of asthma and six with no known disorders.
Measurements Mixed venous carbon dioxide levels; spirometry.
Results Mixed venous carbon dioxide levels in the students with asthma ranged from 5.08 to 5.71 kPa (mean 5.35 kPa), and in the healthy students they ranged from 5.62 to 6.45 kPa (mean 6.01 kPa). The mean difference in mixed venous carbon dioxide levels between the two groups was 0.66 kPa (95% confidence interval 0.28–1.03).
Conclusion This pilot study has demonstrated that a protocol using non-invasive mixed venous carbon dioxide measures is acceptable to people with asthma. It has also added to the evidence suggesting that asthmatic individuals have lower levels of carbon dioxide than the healthy population, even when they are stable and asymptomatic.
diagnosis, asthma, carbon dioxide, pilot study
0031-9406
120 - 124
Bruton, Anne
ceae4c46-7827-4a18-bbba-c9bbdb35db43
Clark, Richard
9499bd5b-19ea-4b47-8200-d909c9f317ba
Bruton, Anne
ceae4c46-7827-4a18-bbba-c9bbdb35db43
Clark, Richard
9499bd5b-19ea-4b47-8200-d909c9f317ba

Bruton, Anne and Clark, Richard (2004) A pilot study measuring mixed venous carbon dioxide levels in students with and without a diagnosis of asthma. Physiotherapy, 90 (3), 120 - 124. (doi:10.1016/j.physio.2004.05.003).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives To pilot a protocol for measuring mixed venous carbon dioxide levels in individuals with asthma and establish likely values and variance for future power calculations.
Design Preliminary pilot study comparing two groups of individuals defined as asthmatic and non-asthmatic.
Setting Lung function laboratory in a regional teaching hospital.
Participants Eleven university students, five with a diagnosis of asthma and six with no known disorders.
Measurements Mixed venous carbon dioxide levels; spirometry.
Results Mixed venous carbon dioxide levels in the students with asthma ranged from 5.08 to 5.71 kPa (mean 5.35 kPa), and in the healthy students they ranged from 5.62 to 6.45 kPa (mean 6.01 kPa). The mean difference in mixed venous carbon dioxide levels between the two groups was 0.66 kPa (95% confidence interval 0.28–1.03).
Conclusion This pilot study has demonstrated that a protocol using non-invasive mixed venous carbon dioxide measures is acceptable to people with asthma. It has also added to the evidence suggesting that asthmatic individuals have lower levels of carbon dioxide than the healthy population, even when they are stable and asymptomatic.

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More information

Published date: 2004
Keywords: diagnosis, asthma, carbon dioxide, pilot study

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 17831
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/17831
ISSN: 0031-9406
PURE UUID: af28d0f3-9956-40b8-bde0-b6b2af129b68

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Nov 2005
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:29

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