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Hypocapnia and asthma: a mechanism for breathing retraining?

Hypocapnia and asthma: a mechanism for breathing retraining?
Hypocapnia and asthma: a mechanism for breathing retraining?
There is some evidence that breathing retraining may be beneficial for patients with asthma, but the mechanism behind this benefit is still unknown. One hypothesis is that individuals can be trained to raise carbon dioxide levels and thereby reverse the bronchoconstrictive effects of hypocapnia and utilize the bronchodilatory effects of hypercapnia. This theory presupposes that individuals with asthma have lower carbon dioxide levels than the healthy population. This article reviews the available evidence supporting the hypothesis and concludes that although attractive, there is currently insufficient evidence to attribute the benefits of breathing retraining to this mechanism.
asthma, patient, article, breathing retraining, carbon dioxide, hypocapnia
0012-3692
1808 - 1811
Bruton, Anne
9f8b6076-6558-4d99-b7c8-72b03796ed95
Holgate, Stephen T.
2938f54c-8823-452a-a2d3-acd0cc38663d
Bruton, Anne
9f8b6076-6558-4d99-b7c8-72b03796ed95
Holgate, Stephen T.
2938f54c-8823-452a-a2d3-acd0cc38663d

Bruton, Anne and Holgate, Stephen T. (2005) Hypocapnia and asthma: a mechanism for breathing retraining? Chest, 127 (5), 1808 - 1811. (doi:10.1378/chest.127.5.1808).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is some evidence that breathing retraining may be beneficial for patients with asthma, but the mechanism behind this benefit is still unknown. One hypothesis is that individuals can be trained to raise carbon dioxide levels and thereby reverse the bronchoconstrictive effects of hypocapnia and utilize the bronchodilatory effects of hypercapnia. This theory presupposes that individuals with asthma have lower carbon dioxide levels than the healthy population. This article reviews the available evidence supporting the hypothesis and concludes that although attractive, there is currently insufficient evidence to attribute the benefits of breathing retraining to this mechanism.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Keywords: asthma, patient, article, breathing retraining, carbon dioxide, hypocapnia

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 17833
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/17833
ISSN: 0012-3692
PURE UUID: c815137e-d1d8-43d5-9e42-c9843e81f13f
ORCID for Anne Bruton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4550-2536

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Nov 2005
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:04

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