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Muscle plasticity: response to training and detraining

Muscle plasticity: response to training and detraining
Muscle plasticity: response to training and detraining
All skeletal muscles have adaptive potential, which means that they are capable of modifying their structure in response to environmental change. Increased and reduced activity are two of the common environmental changes that physiotherapists see in clinical practice (eg muscle training and detraining). The purpose of this article is to review the literature surrounding these two areas. Although many of the adaptations that occur in muscle as a result of increasing or reducing activity are reasonably well understood, there is still no consensus as to the best way either to promote or to prevent these adaptations. General principles for muscle training are accepted, but quantifying exercise prescription (eg in terms of duration, load or repetitions) is not standardised. One of the reasons for this lack of standardisation is the individuality of each person's response to exercise, some of which may be explained by genetic factors. Recent studies have explored the effect of the angiotensin converting enzyme genotype on physical performance, with some conflicting results.
muscle, training, detraining, review
0031-9406
398 - 408
Bruton, Anne
ceae4c46-7827-4a18-bbba-c9bbdb35db43
Bruton, Anne
ceae4c46-7827-4a18-bbba-c9bbdb35db43

Bruton, Anne (2002) Muscle plasticity: response to training and detraining. Physiotherapy, 88 (7), 398 - 408. (doi:10.1016/S0031-9406(05)61265-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

All skeletal muscles have adaptive potential, which means that they are capable of modifying their structure in response to environmental change. Increased and reduced activity are two of the common environmental changes that physiotherapists see in clinical practice (eg muscle training and detraining). The purpose of this article is to review the literature surrounding these two areas. Although many of the adaptations that occur in muscle as a result of increasing or reducing activity are reasonably well understood, there is still no consensus as to the best way either to promote or to prevent these adaptations. General principles for muscle training are accepted, but quantifying exercise prescription (eg in terms of duration, load or repetitions) is not standardised. One of the reasons for this lack of standardisation is the individuality of each person's response to exercise, some of which may be explained by genetic factors. Recent studies have explored the effect of the angiotensin converting enzyme genotype on physical performance, with some conflicting results.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: muscle, training, detraining, review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 17835
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/17835
ISSN: 0031-9406
PURE UUID: b44aa054-4d88-4b91-ab4c-d8696e2fcec6

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Date deposited: 16 Nov 2005
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:29

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Author: Anne Bruton

University divisions

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