The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Anthropogenic Impacts on Marine Ecosystems in Antarctica

Anthropogenic Impacts on Marine Ecosystems in Antarctica
Anthropogenic Impacts on Marine Ecosystems in Antarctica
Antarctica is the most isolated continent on Earth, but it has not escaped the negative impacts of human activity. The unique marine ecosystems of Antarctica and their endemic faunas are affected on local and regional scales by overharvesting, pollution, and the introduction of alien species. Global climate change is also having deleterious impacts: rising sea temperatures and ocean acidification already threaten both pelagic and benthic food webs. The Antarctic Treaty System can address local- to regional-scale impacts, but it does not have purview over the global problems that impinge on Antarctica, such as emissions of greenhouse gases. Failure to address human impacts simultaneously at all scales will lead to the degradation of Antarctic marine ecosystems and the homogenization of their composition, structure, and processes with marine ecosystems elsewhere.
Antarctic Treaty, Antarctica, biodiversity, biological invasion, biotic homogenization, conservation, global warming
0077-8923
82-107
Aronson, R.B.
7ea9275a-0ed5-4622-81e8-bbb78d4997f9
Thatje, S.
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
McClintock, J.B.
7451ae4c-dfa3-4f20-95d0-bbd949b1fda7
Hughes, K.A.
88b93b83-c099-4e78-8e91-e7f02db86782
Aronson, R.B.
7ea9275a-0ed5-4622-81e8-bbb78d4997f9
Thatje, S.
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
McClintock, J.B.
7451ae4c-dfa3-4f20-95d0-bbd949b1fda7
Hughes, K.A.
88b93b83-c099-4e78-8e91-e7f02db86782

Aronson, R.B., Thatje, S., McClintock, J.B. and Hughes, K.A. (2011) Anthropogenic Impacts on Marine Ecosystems in Antarctica. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1223, 82-107. (doi:10.1111/j.1749-6632.2010.05926.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Antarctica is the most isolated continent on Earth, but it has not escaped the negative impacts of human activity. The unique marine ecosystems of Antarctica and their endemic faunas are affected on local and regional scales by overharvesting, pollution, and the introduction of alien species. Global climate change is also having deleterious impacts: rising sea temperatures and ocean acidification already threaten both pelagic and benthic food webs. The Antarctic Treaty System can address local- to regional-scale impacts, but it does not have purview over the global problems that impinge on Antarctica, such as emissions of greenhouse gases. Failure to address human impacts simultaneously at all scales will lead to the degradation of Antarctic marine ecosystems and the homogenization of their composition, structure, and processes with marine ecosystems elsewhere.

Text
Aronson_NYASlowres_11.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 31 March 2011
Keywords: Antarctic Treaty, Antarctica, biodiversity, biological invasion, biotic homogenization, conservation, global warming

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 179175
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/179175
ISSN: 0077-8923
PURE UUID: a5841074-8f8e-4048-b74e-68baf2458a5c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Mar 2011 16:22
Last modified: 18 Nov 2019 21:01

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×