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The limits of human progress: a critical study

The limits of human progress: a critical study
The limits of human progress: a critical study
Human progress cannot be measured by what people produce but by the stages of production. The shift from the development of language in the classical period to religion in the medieval and technical progress after the Renaissance does not tell the whole story. Each of these domains forms an internally consistet system involving people as both agents and subjects of development, and each system tends towards a stifling completeness at its height. Each successive system represents a more primitve need: to communicate, to be at one with the world, to sustain life. As such, each is progressively more universal. But technical progress is not truly systemic, passing by peoples of the underdeveloped world, and requires reflexive thought to bring out this failure, and to integrate technical progress with human progress as a whole
1743-2197
229-236
Simondon, Gilbert
2ccf83f7-093f-44af-8f57-d3fd8a8a8617
Simondon, Gilbert
2ccf83f7-093f-44af-8f57-d3fd8a8a8617
Cubitt, Sean
aad644d3-3b69-4ca8-a999-9b0f809eb729

Simondon, Gilbert (2010) The limits of human progress: a critical study. Cultural Politics: an International Journal, 6 (2), 229-236. (doi:10.2752/175174310X12672016548405).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Human progress cannot be measured by what people produce but by the stages of production. The shift from the development of language in the classical period to religion in the medieval and technical progress after the Renaissance does not tell the whole story. Each of these domains forms an internally consistet system involving people as both agents and subjects of development, and each system tends towards a stifling completeness at its height. Each successive system represents a more primitve need: to communicate, to be at one with the world, to sustain life. As such, each is progressively more universal. But technical progress is not truly systemic, passing by peoples of the underdeveloped world, and requires reflexive thought to bring out this failure, and to integrate technical progress with human progress as a whole

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Published date: July 2010

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 179833
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/179833
ISSN: 1743-2197
PURE UUID: 5110dadf-7566-46e5-b5ef-9d39c03d9f97

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Date deposited: 07 Apr 2011 14:43
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:02

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Contributors

Author: Gilbert Simondon
Translator: Sean Cubitt

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